Feeds

Collaboration: dream or nightmare?

(There’s no F in Team)

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

New hybrid storage solutions

Wave after wave of collaboration software keep crashing on our organisational shores. but with the latest wave of social networking software, should we run for higher ground?

Many people like to collaborate: they enjoy the process and their organisation might benefit from the results. But, historically, this collaboration has been more or less on their own terms.

Following earlier initiatives like groupware and computer supported collaborative work (CSCW), we have the altogether more widespread and more seditious social networking. This started outside the traditional computer environment and gained huge popularity among those who enjoyed socialising and generalised spouting off. Blogs, wikis, instant messaging, social groups, profile pages, tagging, sharing - you name it, millions wanted to be part of it. It was fun.

No surprise then that enterprises started to take an interest. Especially among folk with 'knowledge' in their job titles. They've known for years that the real knowledge in an organisation lies between people's ears. And it was a bugger to get out. With social software, they realised that people would give this stuff up willingly. We've even heard HR departments complain that LinkedIn contains more useful background information on staff than their own expensively maintained records.

But does everyone welcome this new collaborative software? Isn't it easier to get rumbled and to give up your power when you're expected to share so freely?

And what about IT's role? Does it just let users access their favourite hosted services or insist on implementing a collaboration offering from one of the major vendors?

So much for the staff and IT, what about the organisation? Does it see collaboration software bringing genuine benefits or is it just a waste of everyone's time?

We don't know. But we bet you have some thoughts. We'd love to hear from you.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine
Open source? In the government? Ha ha! What, wait ...?
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.