Feeds

BNP races to get membership list off the net

Brown shirts trousers

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Updated The BNP membership list containing over 10,000 names and addresses, which we revealed yesterday is still plastered over the internet despite the far right party's desperate efforts to get it yanked from websites.

A message on the party's website from Nick Griffin, BNP leader, details the list leak and apologises to people having problems with the site which is creaking under extra traffic.

Griffin claims that the membership list dates from between 30 November 2007 and 2 December, although the version seen by The Register includes members from 2008. He also said that some non-members had been maliciously added to the list.

Griffin said the party had sent formal demands to web hosts to remove the list. He also said the party had made a complaint to Dyfed-Powys Police - but Dyfed-Powys was unable to confirm this to us. The BNP claims it will be asking for an investigation into breaches of the Data Protection Act, theft and receipt of stolen goods and breaches of the Human Rights Act.

A spokesman for the BNP said: "A detective inspector is investigating our complaint. The unions and the Labour party are behind this. Last night hundreds of our members got calls from a call centre." The BNP refused to tell us which web hosts had been asked to remove the information.

The problem for BNP members is that several of them work for the police, army and prison service - organisations which either have bans on party political activity or specific bans on staff joining the BNP. The Home Office was not able to comment on what action it would take against members revealed to be working for the police or prison service.

Nick Griffin claimed the leak was good news for the extremist party because it showed its members were not "skinhead oiks".

Lancaster Unity, the anti-fascist website, which first revealed the leak, has more.

The list also contains details of several children who are members as part of BNP family membership. Many entries also include notes on members such as their jobs, hobbies and willingness to campaign - one entry for a member in Somerset reads: "Retired retail jeweller. hobbies: freemasonry, church singing - activist."

Extremist websites are full of angry BNP members, gloating anti-fascists and lots of speculation about who is behind the leak - the party has several violently opposed factions which are all busy blaming each other for the cock-up.

The leak is bound to cause acute embarrassment to some - last time the BNP lost a list of members a leading ballerina and a servant at Buckingham Palace were the biggest shocks. This time there are rumours about two Scottish footballers.

But perhaps the real difficulty for the BNP will be getting subscriptions out of people for next year's membership - how many members would join in the knowledge that friends, neighbours and employers will know of their esoteric political leanings?

A spokeswoman for the Information Commissioner’s Office said:

"Following media reports that the personal details of BNP members have been incorrectly disclosed, we will be contacting the party to establish the full facts. We will then decide what action, if any, is appropriate.

"We encourage all organisations to alert the Information Commissioner’s Office if they discover a security breach has occurred. We stand ready to provide advice to organisations to help them deal with breaches effectively and mitigate the risks. We have published specific guidance on managing breaches on our website – www.ico.gov.uk."

Feel free to comment on this story, but please do not post links to the actual list. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders
Veep testifies for Samsung during Apple patent trial
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Don't let no-hire pact suit witnesses call Steve Jobs a bullyboy, plead Apple and Google
'Irrelevant' character evidence should be excluded – lawyers
EFF: Feds plan to put 52 MILLION FACES into recognition database
System would identify faces as part of biometrics collection
Ex-Tony Blair adviser is new top boss at UK spy-hive GCHQ
Robert Hannigan to replace Sir Iain Lobban in the autumn
Alphadex fires back at British Gas with overcharging allegation
Brit colo outfit says it paid for 347KVA, has been charged for 1940KVA
Jack the RIPA: Blighty cops ignore law, retain innocents' comms data
Prime minister: Nothing to see here, go about your business
Singapore decides 'three strikes' laws are too intrusive
When even a prurient island nation thinks an idea is dodgy it has problems
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.