Feeds

French record labels sue, um, SourceForge

Open source haven thumped for harboring P2P app

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

The French music industry is suing four US-based companies for distributing P2P applications that can potentially be used to illegally share music.

Société civile des Producteurs de Phonogrammes en France (SPPF), a group representing French record labels, is targeting Limewire, Morpheus, and Vuze (formerly Azureus) in the legal action.

Its fourth mark is oddly the open source code repository SourceForge, for simply hosting the P2P client project, Shareaza.

At question is France's DADVSI copyright law, which includes an amendment barring making available software that's intended to distribute unauthorized protected works. The provision provides for penalties of up to three years in jail and a €300,000 fine.

SPPF first attempted to sue the companies late last year, but the proceedings were stalled while the court determined if the law could be applied to companies outside of France.

The law can also be used to force companies to develop a way to block the transfer of unauthorized copyright works. Presently, none of the applications have such a feature — and given that no massive file distribution business to our knowledge has figured out a reliable way to do this could result in some interesting repercussion in France.

TorrentFreaks, which flagged the story, notes enforcing a ban on platforms that can be used to distribute unauthorized content is certainly ripe for abuse. What else can be used to distribute content illegally? Oh, say, FTP, web browsers, and email. Hell, the entire Internet itself could be banned in France. ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.