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Apple sued over Jesus Phone 'hairline cracks'

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A New Yorker has sued Apple over hairline cracks known to appear in the Jesus Phone.

In a 23-page complaint that seeks class-action status, Long Island resident Avi Koschitzki howls about poor reception on the 3G iPhone, joining a chorus of existing legal complaints over Apple's use of AT&T's third gen wireless network. But he also accuses Steve Jobs and cult of allowing unsightly physical flaws in their handheld status symbol.

"The 3G iPhones do not and cannot adequately perform due to the insufficient 3G bandwidths and AT&T infrastructure," the suit, which was filed last in federal court in the Eastern District of New York, reads. "Additionally, the iPhones have had well-known and documented issues regarding the premature 'wear-and-tear' of the iPhones’ housing, including the formation of hairline cracks in the iPhones’ casing."

As early as July 31, iPhone buyers turned up at Apple's discussion forums to voice their displeasure over the cracks, and Koschitzki says the company has ignored their hardship.

"Although Apple was and is aware that the iPhones were and are defective, and that consumers have experienced repeated instances of cracked housing, Apple has nevertheless allowed the defectively designed iPhones to be sold to the public," his suit continues.

The cracks seem to appear around the camera lens and Apple logo on the back of the iPhone, near the volume button on the side, and in other areas. Owners of all-white Jesus Phones are particularly peeved because when dirt gets in the cracks, they're even more unsightly.

Many have complained at this Apple thread, and though it seems the discussion was predated by a separate thread, the apparent link is no longer active.

Echoing earlier suits, Koschitzki accuses Apple of misleading consumers with marketing claims that the 3Jesus Phone would be "twice as fast" as the original 2G incarnation. He blames the handset's well-documented reception issues on excessive power draws from AT&T cell towers. "The 3G iPhones demand too much power from the 3G bandwidths and the AT&T infrastructure is insufficient to handle this overwhelming 3G signal based on the high volume of 3G iPhones it and Apple have sold."

AT&T is also named in the suit. ®

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