Feeds

Google crowbars search money machine into YouTube

Buy your way to the top

Build a business case: developing custom apps

In its ongoing struggle to actually make money from YouTube, Google has shoehorned its ridiculously-successful search advertising setup into the popular post-your-own-video site.

Google's new YouTube Sponsored Videos program allows any video poster to pay their way into the site's search results. "Anyone can use Sponsored Videos to make sure their videos find a larger audience, whether you're a start-up band trying to break out with a new single, a film studio seeking to promote an exciting movie trailer, or even a first-time uploader trying to quickly build a following on the site," the ad broker burbles from its Official Blog.

The program operates much like Google's AdWords money machine. You bid for a particular keyword or group of keywords - "taser," for instance, or "sarah palin" - and if you bid high enough, your ad will appear each time someone searches on those terms.

Naturally, Google bills this as an auction. But that's just a euphemism. In any event, video ads are labeled with Google's familiar sponsored link tag, and advertisers pay by the click.

On one level, this move makes perfect sense. According to those clever web trackers comScore, YouTube is the third most searched site on the US web - behind Google and Yahoo!. And Google has proven that search advertising has some distinct advantages over display ads. With search, netizens aren't just gazing at a screen. They're actively looking for something. And if you toss ads into their search results, they may not realize they're ads.

The difference is that YouTube doesn't shuttle surfers directly to products. The best you can do is post an ad for an ad. You can promote a video urging someone to buy a taser, but you can't get them onto the buy page without another click.

And so the struggle continues. Google is also trying its luck with video overlay ads, and though it insists that brain waves prove these ads "compelling," it admits that Madison Avenue isn't that impressed.

Google paid $1.65bn for YouTube in early 2007. ®

A new approach to endpoint data protection

More from The Register

next story
Amazon says Hachette should lower ebook prices, pay authors more
Oh yeah ... and a 30% cut for Amazon to seal the deal
Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate reality' story to be made into TV series
Amazon Studios, Ridley Scott firm to produce The Man in the High Castle
Nintend-OH NO! Sorry, Mario – your profits are in another castle
Red-hatted mascot, red-colored logo, red-stained finance books
Sonos AXES support for Apple's iOS4 and 5
Want to use your iThing? You can't - it's too old
Joe Average isn't worth $10 a year to Mark Zuckerberg
The Social Network deflates the PC resurgence with mobile-only usage prediction
Feel free to BONK on the TUBE, says Transport for London
Plus: Almost NOBODY uses pay-by-bonk on buses - Visa
Twitch rich as Google flicks $1bn hitch switch, claims snitch
Gameplay streaming biz and search king refuse to deny fresh gobble rumors
Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE
4,000 pixels is niche now... Don't say we didn't warn you
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?