Feeds

MoD seeks 'budding Qs' in SME engagement push

Pops open porkbarrel small tin of spam

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

The UK Ministry of Defence says it is keen to hear from "budding Qs who think they could supply the armed forces of the future with high-tech gadgets and gizmos". To that end, the MoD has organised an "innovation day" at Glasgow University.

"The Support for Operations seminar is our way of taking the Centre for Defence Enterprise on tour," said Dr Helen Almey - the Centre's head.

"There is a strong tradition of research and development in Scotland and we hope to be able to build on this to ensure our front-line forces have the best battle-winning technologies for the future," she added.

Bond purists will by now be spluttering into their dry martinis. Q actually works for the Foreign Office, not the MoD, to name just one of the solecisms here.

But it seems that in any case this isn't a recruitment push for the MoD's equivalent of the SIS tech-services arm. Rather it's a stab at trying to get some defence pork out to Scottish SMEs.

You don't have to be Scottish, though, or even go to the Glasgow seminar (Kelvin Gallery at the University of Glasgow on 19 November between 10am and 5pm). If you've got a cunning tech notion which could help our boys and girls on the front line win their battles and come home safe, you can submit a proposal online.

The Centre for Defence Enterprise has been up and running for six months, during which time it says it has received "more than 130" proposals. Six of these have so far been recommended for funding totalling £1.7m - many more are still under consideration.

So the MoD is reaching out to SMEs, to some degree. However you have to say that it would be better to be a traditional huge defence contractor with hundreds of employees to use as hostages in screwing cash out of the government. You might then be able to sell the MoD stuff at several times the market rate, scooping billions in extra revenue - not a paltry few hundred thou here and there.

And neither garage inventors, SMEs nor aerospace globocorps really seem to fit the label "budding Qs".

So it's a confused message from the MoD at best. ®

The next step in data security

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.