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The US blogger arrested for uploading tracks from Chinese Democracy, the long-awaited Guns N'Roses/Axl Rose album, is not likely to serve prison time.

Kevin Coghill, 27, from Culver City, California, was originally charged with a felony carrying a possible five-year jail term but this has been reduced to a misdemeanour for which he will cop a plea. He admits putting the tracks onto his music blog Antiquiet.

Coghill's lawyer told Wired: "We're looking at straight probation as a result of taking this deal."

The blogger was arrested by the FBI, aided by the Recording Industry Ass. of America.

The world has been waiting for the album for 15 years. To put that in perspective, just try and remember if you even had a modem back then, never mind wasting your time downloading music from the web. Axl and the boys' hardwork is due for release at the end of November, but is already attracting abuse from file sharers who have listened to it.

Coghill remains out of prison until the hearing on 8 December. ®

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