Feeds

Mobe number middleman turns old sims into gold

Pulls cash from the back of your drawers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

A new mobile number sales middleman has sprung up, calling itself Numbuz. The company aims to facilitate sales of memorable mobe numbers, while taking a cut for its services.

The really popular numbers, dubbed "golden", are held back by the network operators for their own key staff or promotional purposes. But that leaves millions of slightly less memorable numbers attached to SIMs, many of which are probably clogging up the bottom of drawers - a situation Numbuz aims to resolve for only a 10 per cent handling fee.

Number portability means a lot of people take their number with them, but a surprising number of punters don't bother. Their new operator sends them a replacement SIM with a new number and Facebook (or Bebo etc) takes care of updating the mates. But the old number, relegated to an electronic void, could be useful to someone, and Numbuz intends to find that person.

The company will take a number you enter, and see if it matches any popular pattern or word (using the number-letter relationship on a phone keypad). You can then choose to list your iron-pyrites number and if you sell it then Numbuz will take a ten-per-cent cut. Some chap has already discovered he owns GOOGLE (466453), and is asking a grand and a half for it.

Dialling words has never been very popular in the UK for some reason. While US advertisements are packed with inducements to call "1-800 plumber", we tend to focus on numbers rather than words, though there seems no reason that shouldn't change. Whether British punters can be induced to part with cash for a polished-brass number is another matter, but there seems little harm in trying. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
New EU digi-commish struggles with concepts of net neutrality
Oettinger all about the infrastructure – but not big on substance
PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai
First time the cache network has seen drop in use of 32-bit-wide IP addresses
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.