Feeds

ICANN to terminate notorious registrar's credentials after all

ICANN, I might, I did

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

After a brief delay, the non-profit group that oversees the internet's address system has decided to proceed with plans to revoke the credentials of EstDomains, a domain name registrar with a reputation for catering to cyber criminals.

In a notice posted Wednesday, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers said EstDomains would lose its registrar accreditation on November 24. It cited the conviction of EstDomains President Vladimir Tsastsin in an Estonian court for credit card fraud, money laundering, and document forgery.

ICANN first announced its plans to de-accredit EstDomains two weeks ago, but stayed the move after the registrar appealed the move (PDF), arguing that the court finding was not final.

"On 7 November 2008, EstDomains was informed that, based on ICANN's findings, ICANN was proceeding with the termination of EstDomains' [registrar accreditation], effective 24 November 2008," ICANN wrote in Wednesday's notice.

The termination of EstDomains would mark the third take-down of a business widely accused of enabling spam, malware, and online fraud in the past two months. On Tuesday, network provider McColo was unceremoniously yanked offline following reports by researchers that claimed it was the conduit that allowed a large percentage of the world's spam operators and malicious networks to thrive.

In September, a separate network provider by the name of Intercage was disconnected following similar reports. Among the complaints lodged against Intercage was its large concentration of customers who send spam, sell rogue anti-virus software and engage in other types of fraud. In a now failed attempt to stave off its demise, Intercage agreed to terminate its contract with EstHost, a sister company of EstDomains.

According to ICANN, EstDomains has some 281,000 domain names under management. The non-profit is in the process of selecting another accredited registrar to receive a bulk-transfer of the addresses. If they're as toxic as researchers say, it's hard to imagine who would want them. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Ice cream headache as black hat hacks sack Dairy Queen
I scream, you scream, we all scream 'DATA BREACH'!
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
JLaw, Kate Upton exposed in celeb nude pics hack
100 women victimised as Apple iCloud accounts reportedly popped
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
New Snowden leak: How NSA shared 850-billion-plus metadata records
'Federated search' spaffed info all over Five Eyes chums
Three quarters of South Korea popped in online gaming raids
Records used to plunder game items, sold off to low lifes
Oz fed police in PDF redaction SNAFU
Give us your metadata, we'll publish your data
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.