Feeds

US lost Cold War bomb under Greenland ice

Dude, where's my nuke?

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

The US secretly abandoned a nuclear weapon forty years ago after it was lost beneath the ice in northern Greenland, according to a BBC report.

The Beeb's claims are made citing declassified documents obtained under the US Freedom of Information Act and people involved in the unsuccessful search.

The US military's Thule Air Base was considered to have particular strategic importance in the Cold War, equipped with radar to scan for a possible Soviet Union missile attack from over the North Pole.

Because the Pentagon believed the base was a likely target for a Soviet strike, the military had nuclear-armed bombers circle over the site ready for an attack on Moscow.

In January 1968, a B-52 bomber carrying four nuclear devices crashed several kilometers from the base. The explosives surrounding the weapons detonated without setting off the nuclear devices, which hadn't been armed by the crew, the BBC said.

Military personnel and Danish workers spent months afterward searching the ice for tiny pieces of radioactive debris. But despite the Pentagon's claim that all four weapons were "destroyed," in piecing together the fragments only three nukes were actually accounted for.

The documents also allegedly report a suspicious blackened section of ice with re-frozen shroud lines from a weapon parachute.

Scientists fearing the burning parts had melted through the ice sent a Star III submarine to search the ocean floor. In order to maintain that all had gone well with cleanup, the true purpose of the mission was hidden from Greenland officials, the broadcaster claims.

But the underwater search was unsuccessful due to a combination of technical problems and the ice freezing over for the winter. The military eventually abandoned the recovery, believing it unlikely any classified elements could be recovered by another country and that the radioactive material would soon enough dissolve in the ocean.

Now where have we heard this story before...? ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Our LOHAN spaceplane ballocket Kickstarter climbs through £8000
Through 25 per cent but more is needed: Get your UNIQUE rewards!
LOHAN tunes into ultra long range radio
And verily, Vultures shall speak status unto distant receivers
NASA to reformat Opportunity rover's memory from 125 million miles away
Interplanetary admins will back up data and get to work
SpaceX prototype rocket EXPLODES over Texas. 'Tricky' biz, says Elon Musk
No injuries or near injuries. Flight stayed in designated area
EOS, Lockheed to track space junk from Oz
WA facility gets laser-eyes out of the fog
Volcanic eruption in Iceland triggers CODE RED aviation warning
Lava-spitting Bárðarbunga prompts action from Met Office
LOHAN Kickstarter push breaks TWELVE THOUSAND POUNDS
That's right, folks, you've stumped up OVER 9,000 beer tokens - and counting
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.