Feeds
75%

T-Mobile G1

Operating System 1, Hardware 0

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Review Apart those with either a technical or professional interest, it's open to question how many mobile phone purchasers weigh up the matter of a device's operating system before handing over their cash.

Looks, camera resolution, cost, yes. OS? Probably not. Notwithstanding the fact that you'd need to have spent the last year either under a rock or on another planet not to know that the big thing about the new HTC-made T-Mobile G1 is the new open source Android operating system from Google. But before we get too wrapped up in matters Android, let's take a look at the host handset.

T-Mobile Android G1

T-Mobile's G1: HTC's handset is wholly unremarkable

The G1 looked distinctly underwhelming when the first shots of the white version appeared. Thankfully, our review handset turned up in matte black and looks a whole lot better for it, though it still won't win any beauty contests.

The basic specification is solid enough. You get 802.11b/g Wi-Fi, GPS, quad-band GSM/GPRS/Edge, 7.2Mb/s HSDPA 3G, a 3.2-megapixel camera, Bluetooth and a 3.2in, 320 x 480 screen.

Internal memory is a paltry 192MB, but the G1 comes with a Micro SDHC slot – and a 1GB card in our case – so storage and future expansion isn't an issue. It's one of HTC's better habits that memory cards can usually be swapped without removing batteries and back cases, and this is true of the G1, though you do have to slide the keyboard up to open the slot cover.

The size and weight of the G1 are nothing remarkable: 117 x 55.7 x 17.1mm and 158g. The controls on the slightly angled lower part of the device consist of a menu key below which sits a very Blackberry Pearl-esque trackball which, in turn, is flanked to the left by call answer and Home keys and to the right by Back and call end keys. The volume control is on the left side of the device; the camera key is on the right. At the bottom, you'll find a reset hole – which we never had to resort to – and a covered mini USB port.

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Same old iPad? NO. The new 'soft SIMs' are BIG NEWS
AppleSIM 'ware to allow quick switch of carriers
Arab States make play for greater government control of the internet
Nerds told to get lost in last-minute power grab bid at UN meeting
Brits: Google, can you scrape 60k pages from web, pleeease
Hey, c'mon Choc Factory, it's our 'right to be forgotten'
Of COURSE Stephen Elop's to blame for Nokia woes, says author
'Google did have some unique propositions for Nokia'
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.