Feeds
75%

T-Mobile G1

Operating System 1, Hardware 0

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Review Apart those with either a technical or professional interest, it's open to question how many mobile phone purchasers weigh up the matter of a device's operating system before handing over their cash.

Looks, camera resolution, cost, yes. OS? Probably not. Notwithstanding the fact that you'd need to have spent the last year either under a rock or on another planet not to know that the big thing about the new HTC-made T-Mobile G1 is the new open source Android operating system from Google. But before we get too wrapped up in matters Android, let's take a look at the host handset.

T-Mobile Android G1

T-Mobile's G1: HTC's handset is wholly unremarkable

The G1 looked distinctly underwhelming when the first shots of the white version appeared. Thankfully, our review handset turned up in matte black and looks a whole lot better for it, though it still won't win any beauty contests.

The basic specification is solid enough. You get 802.11b/g Wi-Fi, GPS, quad-band GSM/GPRS/Edge, 7.2Mb/s HSDPA 3G, a 3.2-megapixel camera, Bluetooth and a 3.2in, 320 x 480 screen.

Internal memory is a paltry 192MB, but the G1 comes with a Micro SDHC slot – and a 1GB card in our case – so storage and future expansion isn't an issue. It's one of HTC's better habits that memory cards can usually be swapped without removing batteries and back cases, and this is true of the G1, though you do have to slide the keyboard up to open the slot cover.

The size and weight of the G1 are nothing remarkable: 117 x 55.7 x 17.1mm and 158g. The controls on the slightly angled lower part of the device consist of a menu key below which sits a very Blackberry Pearl-esque trackball which, in turn, is flanked to the left by call answer and Home keys and to the right by Back and call end keys. The volume control is on the left side of the device; the camera key is on the right. At the bottom, you'll find a reset hole – which we never had to resort to – and a covered mini USB port.

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?