Feeds

Microsoft insists Hotmail redesign hasn't left users out in the cold

Put up and shut up

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Microsoft has told The Register that its Hotmail email service is running “normally” today and that the firm is working “to remedy the minor issues faced by some of our users”.

MS has also apparently deleted over 1,500 comments from its Windows Live blog since we told a perplexed company spokesman about the grumbles being posted on its site yesterday.

Many unhappy Hotmail users have complained about the new interface introduced by Microsoft a few weeks ago, and by late Tuesday afternoon nearly 2,000 people had left angry comments about what some have described as a “pathetic” revamp to the free email service.

As of this morning there are only 341 comments on the blog. Microsoft gave us this canned statement about the redesign cockup:

"We're actively investigating the issues noted by our customers and are working to take the appropriate steps to remedy the situation as rapidly as possible.

"We appreciate the feedback from our customers to move the product forward. We continually look for ways to give our users a great experience and hope they will find value in the new features we've released".

Redmond, which claims to have over 280 million Hotmail customers, insisted that, despite the complaints, the launch is “going well”.

It also characteristically refused to reveal how many people had been affected by the problems we have reported with the new interface that include distorted views and missing folders in Hotmail.

On the redesign itself Microsoft told us:

“Every time we improve a product, it takes customers some time to adjust to the changes. We believe that customers will be happy with the improvements in Hotmail once they become accustomed to the new look.”

But there's still plenty of people who disagree.

"These are NOT solutions to the many problems I have with 'New Coke Hotmail'. I am not downloading new software just to get Hotmail working again. I want it to work again on my web browser, like it did for the past ten years before you started messing with it," wrote Hotmail user Tim01.

"Bring back Classic, or make it so that everything that worked about Classic still works (ie it fully supports every browser that Classic did, you can open emails in their own windows again, no Java involved, etc)." ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Time to move away from Windows 7 ... whoa, whoa, who said anything about Windows 8?
Start migrating now to avoid another XPocalypse – Gartner
You'll find Yoda at the back of every IT conference
The piss always taking is he. Bastard the.
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.