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Modem maker to supply white-box Android smartphones

Huawei goes Google

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Modem maker Huawei, best known in the UK as the manufacturer of various carriers' HSDPA 3G dongles, has unveiled plans to make smartphones based on Google’s Android OS.

During a media tour in Shenzhen, China last week, the company confirmed plans to produce Android devices, which will be branded and sold by network operators.

The first such devices will appear during the early part of 2009. The company already produces a limited number of Windows Mobile-based smartphones. Huawei will also be introducing Symbian devices.

Huawei’s keeping mum about exactly how many Android and Symbian-based smartphone models it’ll produce, or what features phones will be equipped with.

"With Android and Symbian we can demonstrate our own customisable software and services," said James Chen, director of marketing at Huawei Terminals Business.

It’s worth noting that the firm recently put its entire handset division up for sale but failed to find a buyer. So it’s possible that its latest announcement will help the firm sweeten the deal for any potential purchasers in future.

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