Feeds

DNA convictions fall as database doubles in size

Magic database finds 0.36% of crimes

Remote control for virtualized desktops

The number of crimes solved thanks to the DNA database is actually falling despite the ever-growing number of people it contains.

Figures given to Parliament show that even though 7 per cent of the UK population are now on the DNA database it helped solve only 0.36 per cent of crimes, down from 0.37 per cent last year. In the same period over half a million people have been added to the database.

In fact there has been no big improvement in convictions since 2000/2001 when the database contained just 1.2 million people but was useful in 0.29 per cent of recorded crimes.

There are 4.7 million records on the English and Welsh database relating to some 4.1 million individuals. In 2007/2008 another 541,000 individuals were added to the database, down from 667,000 the year before.

In 2007/2008 DNA played a useful role in tackling 17,614 crimes out of a total of 4,950,671 crimes recorded. The database cost £1.6m to run last year, down from £2.04m in 2006/2007.

Parliament also got a breakdown of the ethnic appearance and ages of those on the database. It's thought that replication of records means the total number of entries is 13.3 per cent higher than the number of people these records relate to.

There are 80 children aged under ten with DNA records. There are 325,422 DNA records for people of black appearance, 226,938 for people of Asian appearance, 26,300 for people of Chinese, Japanese or south east Asian and 3,294,760 records for people of northern European appearance.

There are just under a million children aged between 10 and 17 on the database - 917,252.

A Home Office spokeswoman said: "The National DNA Database (NDNAD) is a key intelligence tool which has revolutionised the way the police can protect the public through identifying offenders and securing more convictions.

"The benefits of the NDNAD lie not only in detecting the guilty but in eliminating the innocent from inquiries, focusing the direction of inquiries resulting in savings in police time and in building public confidence that elusive offenders may be detected and brought to justice.”

The figures were given in a Parliamentary answer and Genewatch has more here. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Bada-Bing! Mozilla flips Firefox to YAHOO! for search
Microsoft system will be the default for browser in US until 2020
NSA mass spying reform KILLED by US Senators
Democrats needed just TWO more votes to keep alive bill reining in some surveillance
Be real, Apple: In-app goodie grab games AREN'T FREE – EU
Cupertino stands down after Euro legal threats
'Cleantech' a dirty word for VCs? RUBBISH!
They just think the current schemes are terrible
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.