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Doormen's database boss goes

Bouncers' bouncer bounced

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The boss of the government's "database of doormen" Michael Wilson has lost his job after it emerged that his department had failed to check security clearance of the staff employed to...err...check security clearances.

The Security Industry Authority issues licences to doormen and security staff - including those used by government departments. But checks by the Home Office found that 38 agency staff issuing licences had not been cleared to work at the SIA.

Home Department minister Alan Campbell told the Commons yesterday: "we have become aware of some failings in the SIA’s compliance with Home Office requirements for security clearance" Campbell said an interim chief executive would be appointed until a permanent replacement is found.

This is not the first time the bouncers body has been caught failing to stick to door policy - last year it wrongly gave licences to over 6, 000 illegal immigrants. This led to the embarrassment of having illegal immigrants guarding the Home Office and the PM's car.

Last month it was accused by the National Audit Office of overspending its budget by £17.4m. The failure of the introduction of a new licence system in autumn 2007 meant there was a large backlog of applications.

The SIA was charging doormen £190 for a licence but the department was spending £215 on processing each licence. The Authority has issued 248, 000 licences to doorstaff, wheel clampers and CCTV operators since it was created in 2003. ®

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