Feeds

Fujitsu intros satnav notebook and touch-sensitive netbook

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Fujitsu has launched a laptop with an integrated touch-sensitive panel and unveiled of a miniature notebook-cum-satnav.

Fujitsu_LifeBook_N7010_01

Fujitsu's N7010: touch-sensitive 4in sub-display on board

The N7010 sits in the firm’s LifeBook series and is said to be the industry’s first full-size notebook that incorporates a 4in “Touch Zone” display, which is designed to enable users to multitask without cluttering up the main, 16in display. For example, the Touch Zone can be used as an application launcher, a CD/DVD controller or as a photo slideshow display.

Another bonus is that the machine’s touchpad includes Fujitsu’s gesture control feature, which lets you zoom in and out by moving two fingers closer or further apart. It also lets you perform a continuous scroll by moving your finger in a clockwise circular motion to scroll down, or counter-clockwise to scroll up.

Fujitsu_LifeBook_N7010_02

Would you trade your desktop in for this?

Powering the twin screens and numerous applications is a 2.26GHz Intel Core 2 Duo P8400 processor, with 3MB L2 cache and a 1066GHz frontside bus. The machine also has AMD ATI Radeon HD 3470 graphics, with 256MB of dedicated memory.

Fujitsu has designed the N7010 as a desktop replacement, so it comes with all the bells and whistles that range from an integrated Blu-ray player and SD memory card slot, to an integrated eSATA port and 1.3-megapixel webcam. Wi-Fi is built in too.

If portability and size are your core requirements though, the LifeBook U820 will be more up your alley because it has a 5.6in display and weighs in at just 590g.

Fujitsu_LifeBook_U820

Fujitsu's U820 satnav notebook

An integrated GPS receiver and pre-installed Garmin Mobile PC software will let you plot your route across various continents according to points of interest or turn-by-turn navigation.

Under the U820’s miniature hood is an Intel Centrino Atom Z-series processor and the option of either a 120GB HDD or 64GB SSD. Users can choose between a two- and three-cell battery, which will provide roughly 3.5 or 7.5 hours of runtime, respectively.

A fingerprint reader and 1.3-megapixel webcam are both built into the machine’s horizontally rotatable display. Bluetooth and 802.11a/b/g Wi-Fi are also on board.

Both machines are available now, with the N7010 starting at $1500 (£940/€1163) and the U820 at $1050 (£657/€814).

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Samsung Gear S: Quick, LAUNCH IT – before Apple straps on iWatch
Full specs for wrist-mounted device here ... but who'll buy it?
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Now that's FIRE WIRE: HP recalls 6 MILLION burn-risk laptop cables
Right in the middle of Burning Mains Man week
Chumps stump up $1 MEELLLION for watch that doesn't exist
By the way, I have a really nice bridge you might like...
HUGE iPAD? Maybe. HUGE ADVERTS? That's for SURE
Noo! Hand not big enough! Don't look at meee!
AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else
Chip maker claims the Radeon R9 285 is 'best in its class'
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.