Feeds

Debian discord over de-classified developer proposal

Elite in charge?

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Members of the Debian community are up in arms following a surprise announcement over the way project participants are vetted and organized.

The announcement, posted by Debian developer and administrator Joerg Jaspert, proposed - among other things - that a new class of non-technical Debian contributor be introduced. This person would have a lower status than full Debian developers and have limited access to project resources.

Several senior Debian developers responded quickly with accusations the project organization was being hi-jacked by a self-appointed elite that was making backroom decisions without reference to the wider community.

Joey Hess, who works with Jaspert on the Debian Maintainers team, described the announcement as "atrocious" and dismissed the assertion that changes would not "take anything away from" developers as "The Big Lie".

More constructively Lucas Nussbaum, another Debian developer, said while Debian needed more "non-developing" contributors, there were other less-contentious ways to do this.

Debian is continually plagued with problems over recruiting and the status of new contributors. Earlier this year Nussbaum and others raised the issue of the time it took to approve new contributors to Debian, and incoming project leader Steve McIntyre moved quickly to put this right.

McIntyre told The Reg Jaspert's proposal had polarized opinions but he considered it more important to get Lenny - the next version of Debian - finished before taking time to solve this particular problem. McIntyre noted the qualifications and rights associated with being a Debian developer are "very important to many of our developers".

"After Lenny we'll be thrashing out the exact details of whatever changes we want to make. There'll be a project-wide vote on the final proposals to make sure that we're happy with them, but that may take some time yet," he said. "We'll probably get to talk about them more then."®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
Mathematica hits the Web
Wolfram embraces the cloud, promies private cloud cut of its number-cruncher
Mozilla shutters Labs, tells nobody it's been dead for five months
Staffer's blog reveals all as projects languish on GitHub
'People have forgotten just how late the first iPhone arrived ...'
Plus: 'Google's IDEALISM is an injudicious justification for inappropriate biz practices'
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
iOS 8 Healthkit gets a bug SO Apple KILLS it. That's real healthcare!
Not fit for purpose on day of launch, says Cupertino
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.