Feeds

Relocated Oz croc menaces tourist beaches

Find this reptile, and make it snappy

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Oz's Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is taking a bit of stick for relocating a 3.5-metre crocodile to a north Queensland creek from where it has menaced nearby tourist beaches, the Australian reports.

The EPA trapped the beast earlier this year 1000km south of its current home, close to the Cape York community of Bamaga. The agency rather brilliantly decided to tag and dump it near Townsville at Cape Cleveland as part of the "Crocs in Space" tracking programme. The plan was to see if it would establish a new home range.

It did, and soon began to hang around Magnetic Island, just off Townsville. Cue closure of beaches and incensed tourism operators rattling legal sabres in search of compensation.

Townsville-based marine scientist Walter Starck slammed the EPA's "criminal stupidity", and thundered: "If a private citizen were to do something like that, my God, they'd be subject to horrendous fines and penalties. There's absolutely no scientific justification for it - we have hundreds of thousands of large crocodiles all across the top of Australia living in places where there are no people,"

Labor Member for Townsville Mike Reynolds described himself as "absolutely flabbergasted" at the release. He demanded that sustainability minister Andrew McNamara "ensure no crocodile was released so close to Townsville residents in the future".

The matter finally arrived at the State Parliament in Cairns, where opposition leader Lawrence Springborg yesterday probed tourism minister Desley Boyle over what he described as a "hare-brained scientific experiment". Boyle defended that the EPA had "a long-standing practice of removing crocodiles from urban areas and was sure that it would continue".

She insisted crocs were a "drawcard for tourists".

The EPA, meanwhile, yesterday hoped to recapture the rogue reptile following a scheduled satellite fix on the wandering tourist drawcard. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
GRAV WAVE DRAMA: 'Big Bang echo' may have been grit on the scanner – boffins
Exit Planet Dust on faster-than-light expansion of universe
SpaceX Dragon cargo truck flies 3D printer to ISS: Clawdown in 3, 2...
Craft berths at space station with supplies, experiments, toys
That glass of water you just drank? It was OLDER than the SUN
One MEELLION years older. Some of it anyway
NASA rover Curiosity drills HOLE in MARS 'GOLF COURSE'
Joins 'traffic light' and perfect stony sphere on the Red Planet
Big dinosaur wowed females with its ENORMOUS HOOTER
That's right, Doris, I've got biggest snout in the prehistoric world
Japanese volcano eruption reportedly leaves 31 people presumed dead
Hopes fade of finding survivors on Mount Ontake
Canberra drone team dances a samba in Outback Challenge
CSIRO's 'missing bushwalker' found and watered
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.