Feeds

Relocated Oz croc menaces tourist beaches

Find this reptile, and make it snappy

Business security measures using SSL

Oz's Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is taking a bit of stick for relocating a 3.5-metre crocodile to a north Queensland creek from where it has menaced nearby tourist beaches, the Australian reports.

The EPA trapped the beast earlier this year 1000km south of its current home, close to the Cape York community of Bamaga. The agency rather brilliantly decided to tag and dump it near Townsville at Cape Cleveland as part of the "Crocs in Space" tracking programme. The plan was to see if it would establish a new home range.

It did, and soon began to hang around Magnetic Island, just off Townsville. Cue closure of beaches and incensed tourism operators rattling legal sabres in search of compensation.

Townsville-based marine scientist Walter Starck slammed the EPA's "criminal stupidity", and thundered: "If a private citizen were to do something like that, my God, they'd be subject to horrendous fines and penalties. There's absolutely no scientific justification for it - we have hundreds of thousands of large crocodiles all across the top of Australia living in places where there are no people,"

Labor Member for Townsville Mike Reynolds described himself as "absolutely flabbergasted" at the release. He demanded that sustainability minister Andrew McNamara "ensure no crocodile was released so close to Townsville residents in the future".

The matter finally arrived at the State Parliament in Cairns, where opposition leader Lawrence Springborg yesterday probed tourism minister Desley Boyle over what he described as a "hare-brained scientific experiment". Boyle defended that the EPA had "a long-standing practice of removing crocodiles from urban areas and was sure that it would continue".

She insisted crocs were a "drawcard for tourists".

The EPA, meanwhile, yesterday hoped to recapture the rogue reptile following a scheduled satellite fix on the wandering tourist drawcard. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
PORTAL TO ELSEWHERE scried in small galaxy far, far away
Supermassive black hole dominates titchy star formation
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Edge Research Lab to tackle chilly LOHAN's final test flight
Our US allies to probe potential Vulture 2 servo freeze
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
Bacon-related medical breakthrough wins Ig Nobel prize
Is there ANYTHING cured pork can't do?
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub
Boozed-up ancients drank beer before tearing corpses apart
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.