Sarkozy fails to stop sale in voodoo hoohah

French judge sticks it to pincushion prez

Semi-barmy kneehigh French premier Nicolas Sarkozy has failed in his attempt to whip from French shelves a voodoo doll bearing his handsome likeness.

As the Reg helpfully informed you, Sarko was stomping courtwards to demand the withdrawal of the dolls which were sold along with a user guide and a satirical biography. But according to the Beeb a judge in Paris has thrown the case out, saying the doll was "within the authorised limits of free expression and the right to humour".

Sarko's case was based on unauthorised use of his image to which he claims "exclusive and absolute rights", rather than any actual superstition that he would wake up with a tremendous unexplainable pain in his head, knee or other body part. However, this did not wash with publishing company K&B, which dug its heels in at Sarko's request for them to pull their product and sniffed that his reaction was "totally disproportionate". (We bet that sounded even sniffier in French too.)

Former presidential hopeful Ségolène Royal has sensibly opted not to take legal action over her own voodoo likeness, also sold by K&B, because "I have a sense of humour". Oof.

For some reason, sales of the Sarko voodoo kit are now reported up. Publishing experts and media commentators are said to be "baffled".

Next week: Sarkozy brings the full might of his legal team to bear on himself, after seeing his unauthorised image reflected in a puddle. ®

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