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Government advice about being careful what you post on the web may have come just a little too late for Andrew Sachs’ granddaughter, Georgina Baillie – aka Voluptua, the goth vampire stripper. The same advice might also have been helpful to the pictures desk over at the Daily Mail, which along with Ms Baillie has been indulging in a flurry of online back-tracking over the last couple of days.

Meanwhile, serious embarrassment awaits The Sun, which appears to have dropped objections to Nazi-inspired porn in its haste to adopt Miss Baillie as a poster girl for the cause of wronged youth.

We are indebted to the Heresiarch, who has done a fine job researching images of an interestingly semi-clad Miss Baillie and tracking down some of the online changes that have taken place to her profile over the last couple of days. It’s a mucky job – but someone has to do it.

The edits of Miss Baillie’s career include a sudden rush of coyness about the extent of her collaboration with the Satanic Sluts, whose online oeuvre contains references to “visceral video” containing scenes of “torture, gore, piercing, satanic sacrifice, whipping, bondage, vampirism, medical experiments and nun abuse”. It seems unlikely that fans of The Sound of Music will be natural converts to their films.

To be fair, Miss Baillie is not so much seeking to disown her past as to spin it ever so slightly. References to herself as a “swinger” have now been amended to claims that she is “in a relationship”. Her profile picture appears to have changed from gothic to merely ethereal, while her greeting to visitors is no longer a string of swear words, but the much cuddlier “Voluptua thanks so much for all of your support”.

She is not denying her links to the Satanic Sluts, nor indeed her membership of the even more extreme sluts. She is merely attempting to play down her acting in one of their earlier films, Australian Vampire in London, which, according to the Heresiarch, she describes self-deprecatingly as “so bad that it’s actually good”.

Readers wishing to review this work for themselves may still catch it here.

The Register believes that much of this editing is directed by Voluptua herself. However, readers must tread carefully. A message on Voluptua’s site this morning states: “Voluptua’s myspace has been HACKED! Please ignore any strange messages, they are not from me.”

Bluff? Double-bluff? And what, in this context, would count as a strange message?

While Miss Baillie may not be overly ashamed of her sexuality, the Daily Mail picture desk is treading more carefully. A picture that illustrated the original article has been withdrawn – though not before it was harvested by the diligent image-gatherers at Consenting Adult Action Network — and replaced with slightly softer images here and here.

Is this simple concern for their family readership? Or advance damage limitation against the day when the soon to be active extreme porn law could make such images illegal?

Last but by no means least, what of The Sun, which appears to have paid handsomely for kiss and tell revelations about what went on between Miss Baillie and former BBC employee Russell Brand?

Readers may be reminded of the paper’s dogged persecution of Max Mosley earlier this year: a central pillar to The Sun’s defence of its actions was that Mr Mosley’s BDSM activities had had a Nazi theme to them.

How strange, therefore, that the rag should have missed the implication of the Satanic Sluts’ choice of initials. Especially as a cursory glance at their site would show in all sorts of ways, from typeface selection through to their tagline – “One Faith, one Creed, one Order” – a much more overt playing with Nazi themes than Mr Mosley ever indulged in.

Either The Sun has learnt from its experiences in the recent libel case of its sister paper the News of the World – and support for a member of a group which urges its readers to “Join the SS” is now quite okay.

Otherwise, there are soon going to be red faces all round in the upper editorial reaches of Wapping. ®

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