Feeds

Academic avoids extradition over Holocaust denial

German warrant lacking website details chucked out of court

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

An Australian academic accused of holocaust denial has escaped extradition from the UK to Germany.

Dr Gerald Toben, 64, was accused of publishing anti-Semitic content on his website. But a judge threw an extradition request out of court after deciding it was invalid because it lacked any details of the website where the allegedly inflammatory material was written, among other factors.

The German authorities offered to find out the necessary details, but Judge Daphne Wickham ruled that allowing the admission of a "drip-feed of information" was unacceptable, ruling in favour of the defendant and discharging the case. "I find that the particulars are vague and imprecise. I find the warrant invalid and therefore discharge the defendant,", the Daily Telegraph reports.

German authorities plan to appeal against the judge's decision. In the meantime, Dr Toben was granted bail once he raises a £100,000 bond. Conditions of his bail include fixed residency, a prohibition on using the internet and a block on giving interviews to the media.

The contentious material was allegedly posted online by Dr Toben between 2000 and 2004. An extradition warrant was issued in October 2004 over material that allegedly downplayed the extent of the Nazi's mass extermination of Jewish people during World War II.

Dr Toben was cuffed at London's Heathrow airport on 1 October while in transit between the US and Dubai.

The controversial author and historian was reportedly jailed in Germany back in 1999 for "defaming the dead", an offence under German Holocaust memorial laws.

The Adelaide Institute website run by Dr Toben has attracted criticism for years. Eight years ago he fended off a lawsuit from the Human Rights and Equal Opportunities Commission in Australia arguing that offensive content posted on the site breached Australian racial discrimination laws and ought to be taken down.

Dr Toben claims he has no hope of receiving a fair trial in the event of his extradition to Germany. He further claims the current charges against him are a cyber re-hash of the 1999 prosecution. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.