Feeds

Comcast eyes AT&T's American broadband crown

Pulled up by its VoIP straps

The next step in data security

Comcast is on the verge of surpassing AT&T as America's number one broadband provider.

In releasing its Q3 earnings today, the cableco boasted 382,000 new broadband subscribers for the quarter ending September 30 - more additions than AT&T and Verizon combined. That gives Comcast 14.7 million broadband subscribers in total, just 100,000 less than AT&T.

Two-thirds of those 382,000 new subscribers are cable converts from DSL - the phone-line-based broadband technology that AT&T and Verizon are slowly replacing with high-speed fiber connections.

Apparently, Comcast is out-pacing its rivals in the so-called "triple play" game, in which comm giants attempt to destroy each other by bundling voice, data, and TV in a single package. Though Comcast lost 4,000 circuit-switched phone subscribers during Q3 - as it phases out old school phone service - the cableco added 483,000 voice over IP subscribers. That means its fledgling phone service is growing faster than the fledgling fiber TV services offered by the traditional telcos. At least for now.

Like AT&T and Verizon, Comcast is holding up quite well as the worldwide economy melts away. Q3 earnings jumped 38 per cent from a year ago, as it beefed up its cable TV rates and dropped spending.

"We delivered solid results in the third quarter, demonstrating the underlying strength of our subscription businesses and our ability to operate well in a challenging economic and competitive environment," reads a canned statement from chairman and CEO Brian L. Roberts. "Importantly, our financial position has never been stronger, reflecting disciplined and prudent balance sheet management and strong free cash flow growth."

The company earned $771m in Q3, or 26 cents per share, on $8.55bn in revenues. The Wall Street guessmen were expecting profits of 22 per cents a share, but Comcast shares still tumbled. Its stock was down 9.91 per cent when the NASDAQ closed for the day.

That said, shares climbed 24 per cent the day before, as Wall Street decided to push the market up.

Last week, Comcast announced that it rolling out wideband DOCSIS 3.0 service in New England, Philadelphia, and New Jersey, and it expects the technology will be available in 10 major markets by the end of the year. Sometime before year's end, the company will also stop busting BitTorrents. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.