Feeds

Fraudsters get into the cloud

Fraud as a service persists post-Dark Market

Website security in corporate America

Hackers are applying the ideas of cloud computing to online fraud in a move that means even technically illiterate crooks can move into cybercrime.

Fraud as a service products are being punted through underground forums, according to Uri Rivner, head of new technologies at RSA's consumer division. This means that for around $299 a month, would-be phishing fraudsters need only log on to obtain fraud lists, with the grunt work of writing Trojan code, hosting, distribution and updates carried out behind the scenes on their behalf.

The development of Web 2.0 fraud is not entirely without risk for fraudsters - for one thing cases have being recorded where phishing toolkits contained backdoors. The FBI's successful sting on members of the Dark Market underground forum has made fraudsters more wary of trusting their supposed partners in crime on other sites, according to Rivner.

Despite these issues, a certain level of trust among thieves remains. Underground hackers have developed cybercrime versions of social networking sites and collaboration suites. Blogs, forums and podcasts have mushroomed, with hackers even reviewing Trojans in much the same way the mainstream tech press reviews anti-malware products.

An example of the sophistication of cracker collateral can be found in a training video by Turkish credit card skimmer supplier Chao, posted through YouTube (below). A suspect reckoned to be Chao was arrested as part of the FBI's take down of the denizens of the Dark Market forum. The ATM fraud devices created by Chao were put together from off-the-shelf components.

Chao's video is media-savvy and even amusing. The cartoon representation of Chao (which wouldn't look out of place on South Park) offers top tips in broken English on issues such as avoiding the installation of skimmers in small towns or during the morning, when people are likely to be more vigilant.

Discussions about cybercrime often revolve around miscreants based in Eastern Europe - especially Russia - but Brazilian hackers are arguably the most technically sophisticated in the world. Australia is often a testing ground for the latest attack techniques, while the land of the samba has emerged as a hot spot in the evolution of new malware and attack techniques, particularly in the sphere of phishing. "Brazil is a cesspool of fraud," Rivner said. ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
'Kim Kardashian snaps naked selfies with a BLACKBERRY'. *Twitterati gasps*
More alleged private, nude celeb pics appear online
Hackers pop Brazil newspaper to root home routers
Step One: try default passwords. Step Two: Repeat Step One until success
UK.gov lobs another fistful of change at SME infosec nightmares
Senior Lib Dem in 'trying to be relevant' shocker. It's only taxpayers' money, after all
Spies would need SUPER POWERS to tap undersea cables
Why mess with armoured 10kV cables when land-based, and legal, snoop tools are easier?
TOR users become FBI's No.1 hacking target after legal power grab
Be afeared, me hearties, these scoundrels be spying our signals
Snowden, Dotcom, throw bombs into NZ election campaign
Claim of tapped undersea cable refuted by Kiwi PM as Kim claims extradition plot
Freenode IRC users told to change passwords after securo-breach
Miscreants probably got in, you guys know the drill by now
THREE QUARTERS of Android mobes open to web page spy bug
Metasploit module gobbles KitKat SOP slop
BitTorrent's peer-to-peer chat app Bleep goes live as public alpha
A good day for privacy as invisble.im also reveals its approach to untraceable chats
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.