Feeds

How storage can save the world

Have you hugged your storage manager today?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

Whitepaper It's a shame storage is so boring - or at least, that it is perceived as such by anyone that isn't actually into storage. A cursory glance from the balconies at Olympia, at last week's Storage Expo would suggest it's anything but dull - there are indeed plenty of people who have a deep interest in all things relating to how information is retained, maintained and ultimately destroyed - and they certainly seemed to be having an animated time of it all, particularly when the cases of beer were cracked open about 4pm on day one.

From the perspective of the outsider, there are essentially three categories of storage guy. There are the hardware junkies, who like nothing more than a discussion on fibre channel architectures and disk transfer rates - "Storage is so much more than speeds and feeds," they say, before talking about exactly that.

Then there are the storage software nuts, for whom all the world is an index - or at least it would be if only they were allowed to be in charge - and who remain just slightly flummoxed that businesses still aren’t backing up their heaving pools of data according to policy. Imagine.

Finally, there are the business-facing types who debate the difference between records management and retention management, as if anyone other than records managers and retention managers actually gave a monkey’s left nostril. Storage folks are perhaps the IT crowd's IT crowd, as far as stereotypes go.

But in these turbulent times, the trouble is that all these types might be a little more important than the rest of us give them credit. If there’s one thing that doesn’t seem to be shrinking any, it's our hunger for data – indeed, one can almost imagine, the day after Armageddon, some teenager would be recording a video of the aftermath and looking to post it on YouTube. Credit crunch there may be, but even this spawns blog sites like The Brokers with Hands On Their Faces blog.

It's the same on corporate fileshares and intranets, where "user-generated content" is (so we are told) one of the fastest growing forms of data being managed. One of the toughest things about such stuff is it's very difficult to see what should be kept and what should be binned, for whatever reason – with the inevitable result that everything gets kept. Indeed, in a study we conducted earlier this year, over 40 per cent of respondents actively stated their policy was to 'keep everything'. Even that slightly sick email exchange... or particularly that slightly sick email exchange.

While we aren't convinced the world will ever run out of storage (it's been stated, but seems a tad unlikely), we do concur that there's plenty that can, and should be done to keep things under control. It's not just about coping – efficiency mechanisms are also a good counter to issues of power management, and aspirations of IT sustainability.

There are a number of new technologies that enable storage to be run more efficiently, and the data to be managed more effectively than before – virtualisation, classification and tiering are some of the keywords, all of which suggest that we need to think about storage as far more than just spinning disks. We’d be very interested in your feedback as always, and if you want to delve a little deeper into what capabilities you should be looking for in your storage, take a butcher's hook at our primer. ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
Microsoft builds teleporter weapon to send VMware into Azure
Updated Virtual Machine Converter now converts Linux VMs too
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.