Feeds

Home Office acts to kick out Iceland's hate preachers

No safe haven for Norway or Liechtenstein

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Just weeks after the UK government used the 2001 Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act to seize all of the IOUs in British branches of Icelandic banks, tough-talking Home Secretary Jacqui Smith has made it clear that Britain will no longer be a safe haven for terror preachers from Iceland. Or indeed from Norway or Liechtenstein.

New rules announced today by the Home Office will make it easier to exclude "those who want to come to the UK to stir up religious or racial hatred", and for the first time "we will name and shame preachers of hate", it says here.

Where indeed it also says that the Home Office will "introduce changes that will allow us to exclude from the UK nationals of the European Economic Area, and their families, before they travel to this country where they constitute a threat to public security or policy."

Do all European Economic Area (EEA) nationals and their families constitute a threat when they're in the UK? Who'd have thought? The EEA consists of all the EU member states plus Iceland, Norway and Liechtenstein, and it is the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations (2006) that Smith proposes to amend in order to let her exclude/kick out terror bankers, tension-stirring tax avoiders and hate-preaching herring fishermen. At least.

In principle, given that the whole of the EU population plus some counts as EEA citizens, her statement to the House today could be interpreted as meaning she proposes to give herself powers to exclude any or all of them. But if that's what she actually meant, it would entail reversing out the 2004 EU freedom of movement directive (which the 2006 regulations implemented in the UK), and quite possibly out of the EU itself as a consequence.

We doubt that tough-talking Jacqui's that tough, so it's probably just Iceland, Norway and Liechtenstein she's gunning for. This time. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.