Feeds

Google Earth lands on Jesus Phone

Is that the Western Hemisphere in your pocket?

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Google has squeezed its world-snooping software, Google Earth, into a small, small world for Apple's iPhone/iPod Touch.

Image courtesy Google

Like its desktop sibling, the application lets users fly around a 3D view of Earth made from aerial and satellite imagery. Google Earth for iPhone is available for free in 18 languages and 22 countries in the iTunes App Store.

The app makes use of the iPhone's touch screen and motion-sensing capabilities to navigate Terra Firma. Getting around the globe is done by the iPhone's usual affair of finger-swiping, pinching, and tapping. Tilling the device adjusts the view to see 3D terrain (3D buildings aren't yet available for the portable version). The app also takes advantage of the iPhone's location finder to quickly zoom to the user's approximate spot.

Google said it has included over eight million geo-located Panoramio photos and lets users read location-based Wikipedia articles too. (Clicking on Wikipedia articles, however, seemed to crash the app on the iPod Touch El Reg was using as often as not).

Google Earth appears to push the iPhone/iPod Touch near its graphical limits. It takes about 15 seconds to boot on startup and can be a bit of a slide show when you're browsing.

It's nonetheless an impressive piece of software and a novelty to fit comfortably in pants. It's also free, so no tears needed for any spotty behavior.

Google Earth for iPhone requires an internet connection for any meaningful use. Without access, the app reuses data saved from a previous session - which puts a serious crimp on exploration.

And exploration is really the whole point of Google Earth. There's a search feature included of course, but sooner or later the app will want to spit the user out into Safari or the Google Maps app if additional info and directions are needed.

Google provides a video tour of Google Earth over at the Maps team blog. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.