Feeds

Speaking clock gets Disneyfied

Tinker Bell takes to the mic at BT's 123

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

Middle England should prepare to drop its trousers, bend over the table and accept the painful truth that if anything in this Sceptred Isle was ever sacred, it isn't any more.

As of the end of British Summer Time on Sunday, BT's famous speaking clock will be voiced by Tinker Bell - the result of a "sponsorship deal with Disney" which will also see the traditional pips replaced with bells.

Of course, Tinker Bell doesn't usually speak, but this detail has not stopped Disney deploying actress Mae Whitman to voice the part in its forthcoming film entitled, you guessed it, Tinker Bell. Whitman will also grace the three-month speaking clock promotion for the movie, according to Sky News.

The old timers among you who can remember when it was all fields round here will recall the dulcet tones of London telephonist Jane Cain, who was the first voice of the speaking clock when it came into service in July 1936. She was followed by London telephone exchange supervisor Miss Pat Simmons, who intoned the hour from 1963 until 1984.

Enter Brian Cobby, an assistant supervisor at Withdean exchange in Brighton, the third verbal timepiece until 2007, when incumbent Sara Mendes da Costa won the post in a competition.

As Sky notes, the Tinker Bell outrage is not the first time the time has been read by an imposter. Back in 2003, Lenny Henry's 123 gig helped raise £200k for Comic Relief - but then that was for charity and not to punt some bloody speaking fairy flick.

British Summer Time ends on Sunday 26 October at 01:00 GMT, when the clocks go back an hour. That means you'll have an extra hour over the weekend to listen to Tinker Bell, should you so wish. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Forget the beach 'n' boardwalk, check out the Santa Cruz STEVE JOBS FOUNTAIN
Reg reader snaps shot of touching tribute to Apple icon
Oz bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL
Bank: 'We are now safely patched.' Customers: 'You were using OpenSSL?'
Happy 40th Playmobil: Reg looks back at small, rude world of our favourite tiny toys
Little men straddle LOHAN, attend tiny G20 Summit... ah, sweet memories...
Spanish village called 'Kill the Jews' mulls rebranding exercise
Not exactly attractive to the Israeli tourist demographic
Lego is the TOOL OF SATAN, thunders Polish priest
New minifigs like Monster Fighters are turning kids to the dark side
Dark SITH LORD 'Darth Vader' joins battle to rule, er, Ukraine
Only I can 'make an empire out of a republic' intones presidential candidate
Chinese company counters pollution by importing fresh air
Citizens line up for bags of that sweet, sweet mountain air
Google asks April Fools: Want a job? Be our 'Pokemon Master'
Mountain View is prankin' like it's 1999...
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.