Feeds

Google: Guinea pig brainwaves prove video ads 'compelling'

When you watch YouTube, what's your 'skin response'?

Remote control for virtualized desktops

As part of its increasingly desperate attempt to actually make some money from YouTube, Google is reading the brainwaves of human guinea pigs in an effort to judge the effectiveness of video ads.

As reported by ZDNet, Google has teamed with an outfit dubbed NeuroFocus to measure the impact of video overlay ads on brain activity, eye movement, and, um, skin response.

NeuroFocus bills itself as a company that applies "the latest advances in neuroscience to the world of advertising and messaging," and after running those Googlicious EEG brain scans, it has reached the following conclusions:

1) InVideo overlay ads are compelling

2) InVideo overlay ads add to user experience

3) InVideo overlay ads improve positive brand response

Which makes us wonder whose brains they were scanning. If you know someone who finds InVideo overlay ads "compelling," do drop us a line.

Of course, we've yet to meet someone who's even marginally compelled to click on other Google ads, and last quarter, the company raked in $1.35bn in profits.

With search ads, however, we wouldn't be surprised if there are millions on people on earth who don't realize they're ads.

In any event, Google's brain-scan-fueled video ad conclusions are just what you'd expect from the world's largest ad broker. In announcing quarterly earning this summer, co-founder Sergey Brin dubbed Google's search ads "a very important source of information." And on the search side, the company has far less reason to talk such nonsense.

On the video side, the company is having some trouble convincing old school Madison Avenue types that YouTube ads are worthwhile. If you paid $1.65bn for a website no one wanted to advertise on, you'd be tossing brainwave nonsense too. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Musicians sue UK.gov over 'zero pay' copyright fix
Everyone else in Europe compensates us - why can't you?
Megaupload overlord Kim Dotcom: The US HAS RADICALISED ME!
Now my lawyers have bailed 'cos I'm 'OFFICIALLY' BROKE
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
BT said to have pulled patent-infringing boxes from DSL network
Take your license demand and stick it in your ASSIA
Right to be forgotten should apply to Google.com too: EU
And hey - no need to tell the website you've de-listed. That'll make it easier ...
prev story

Whitepapers

10 ways wire data helps conquer IT complexity
IT teams can automatically detect problems across the IT environment, spot data theft, select unique pieces of transaction payloads to send to a data source, and more.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Mitigating web security risk with SSL certificates
Web-based systems are essential tools for running business processes and delivering services to customers.