Feeds

Amazon delivers Windows-powered cloud

No SLA for grownups

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Amazon has launched a beta version of its Elastic Compute Cloud running Windows, while taking early steps to make EC2 appealing to business users.

The company has begun offering the option of running instances on 32- and 64-bit versions of Windows with data backed up to the 64-bit edition of Microsoft's SQL Server database.

Amazon will add it's DevPay in the "near future" so you can charge customers for your hosted applications running on the Windows portion of EC2.

The company said it's expecting a range of Windows-related services, including ASP.NET sites for hosted web services and services utilizing High-Performance Computing (HPC). Pricing for the Windows service starts at $0.125 per hour.

The launch comes a week ahead of Microsoft's Professional Developers' Conference in Los Angeles, California, where Microsoft will talk about its own roadmap for cloud-based computing services. Amazon will be running EC2 at PDC.

Amazon, meanwhile, has taken the "beta" sticker off of the Unix-powered portion of its cloud and announced service-level agreements (SLAs) for EC2's use in real business.

The agreement, though, is a little bare bones and more a commitment to service uptime. Amazon has promised 99.95 per cent uptime or a 10 per cent "service credit."

Missing are some SLA basics such as a commitment to notify users of potential problems or service changes, an outline of back up or contingency plans in the case of outage, numbers of users that can be supported simultaneously, specific performance benchmarks or usage statistics that'll be provided by Amazon or the EC2 system.

Amazon has promised some capabilities in 2009 to make management "even easier." These include a management console for configuration and operation of your applications in the Amazon cloud, and real-time, multi-dimensional monitoring of host resources that Amazon said would let you aggregate data across instances, time slots, and "availability zones." ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine
Open source? In the government? Ha ha! What, wait ...?
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.