Feeds

Sun shares DARPA dough with photon biz (again)

Chipping the light fantastic

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

As it fashions optical chip links for the US military, Sun Microsystems has enlisted the help of another optically-minded partner.

Last month, Kortura Inc. leapt aboard the Ultraperformance Nanophotonic Intrachip Communications (UNIC) project, a DARPA-funded undertaking run by Sun, and this month, it's the California-based Luxera joining the party.

In linking processor cores with light, Sun and DARPA hope to increase speed and bandwidth while reducing cost and power consumption. In March, DARPA - the central research operation of the US Department of Defense - gave Sun $44m to chip the light fantastic, and now it's sharing chunks of that government cash with Kortura and Luxtera, two companies that undoubtedly own the same whalesong CD.

"We selected Luxtera for its proven technology and processes and overall expertise required for developing next-generation photonics technology for the UNIC program," reads a statement from Dr. Jim Mitchell, a Sun fellow and VP of new technology adoption at the company. "They have been extremely successful in the utilization of Silicon CMOS Photonics and delivering direct ‘fiber-to-the-chip’ connectivity in commercial products."

Founded in 2001, Luxtera began sampling a photonic chip linking technology at the end of last year, combining fiber-optic communication techniques with standard CMOS silicon manufacturing techniques. In partnering with Sun, the company will provide "strategic direction, baseline optoelectronic circuits, tools, and device design support."

"A key element of our technology is that we enable fabrication of optical and electronic circuits on a common mainstream CMOS chip," says Luxtera CEO Greg Young. "This capability is the key enabler of next-generation, optically interconnected multi-core processors and computing systems."

Young claims that Luxtera is the only company to produce such technology on a mass scale. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.