Feeds

Sky and BBC in iPlayer deal

Agree to use HTML

Intelligent flash storage arrays

The BBC and Sky are today trumpeting a new arrangement that will see the latter stuff links to iPlayer shows into its own web TV service.

And... er... that's pretty much it. Given the Sky Player's weedy traffic*, the move is likely to have negligible impact on usage of iPlayer. Meanwhile, Sky offering categorised links to already easily available BBC shows is unlikely to pull the crowds to its site.

Sky's director of on-demand Griff Parry said: "Access to BBC content along with improvements to the user experience will further support the ongoing success of Sky Player... The addition of links to content from BBC channels further demonstrates Sky’s role as a leading online aggregator with access to one of the broadest selections of online video."

The fact that the pair have announced the links as a "partnership" is the most significant aspect of the news. Relations between Sky and BBC management are poor historically. BBC suspicions about Rupert Murdoch were seemingly confirmed when he booted it from his Chinese satellite in 1994 at the behest of Beijing censors.

Sky is currently a leading objector to the BBC's commercial on-demand push Project Kangaroo, which is being examinined by the Competition Commission. Auntie's involvement with Channel 4 and ITV on that project is being handled by its commercial arm BBC Worldwide, however, separate from iPlayer.

Today iPlayer boss Anthony Rose said: "This deal further underlines our commitment to reaching new audiences by making BBC iPlayer available on as many services as possible."

A version of iPlayer for the millions of Sky set-top boxes in UK homes would be a much more interesting development. The implementation that allows Virgin Media subscribers to watch BBC shows on-demand in their living rooms now accounts for a third of total iPlayer usage. ®

*"There are hundreds of thousands of unique registered users for the service," the press release says. There's no mention of how many actually use it.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Bladerunner sequel might actually be good. Harrison Ford is in it
Go ahead, you're all clear, kid... Sorry, wrong film
Musicians sue UK.gov over 'zero pay' copyright fix
Everyone else in Europe compensates us - why can't you?
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Euro Parliament VOTES to BREAK UP GOOGLE. Er, OK then
It CANNA do it, captain.They DON'T have the POWER!
Megaupload overlord Kim Dotcom: The US HAS RADICALISED ME!
Now my lawyers have bailed 'cos I'm 'OFFICIALLY' BROKE
Forget Hillary, HP's ex CARLY FIORINA 'wants to be next US Prez'
Former CEO has political ambitions again, according to Washington DC sources
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
10 ways wire data helps conquer IT complexity
IT teams can automatically detect problems across the IT environment, spot data theft, select unique pieces of transaction payloads to send to a data source, and more.