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Intel signs up Ericsson for internet tablet HSDPA kit

Hopes pact will last longer than its Nokia partnership

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Intel and Nokia may have drifted apart before the Finnish phone giant could create HSDPA 3G modules for Centrino laptops, but the chip giant is hoping to have better luck with its 'Moorestown' Mobile Internet Device (MID) platform.

Intel mobility chief Anand Chandrasekher today said Ericsson had agreed to make HSDPA/HSUPA modules for Moorestown-based machines.

Belgium's Option is also preparing Moorestown-friendly HSDPA/HSUPA cards, he said.

Moorestown is the successor to Intel's Centrino Atom platform, launched in April and codenamed 'Menlow'. The new version brings more of the chipset onto the main processor die to create a system-on-a-chip called 'Lincroft' with a 45nm CPU, graphics core, video decoder and DDR 3-friendly memory controller.

Lincroft connects to an I/O part called 'Langwell' over a 'Nehalem'-style DMI bus. Langwell will incorporate controllers for USB, PCI Express, ATA peripherals and other system basics.

Chandrasekhere demo'd a working version of Moorestown. He re-iterated the platform's 2009-2010 launch timeframe.

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