Feeds

Symantec gives 3PAR helping hand

Giant pushes fat-to-thin process

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

It turns out 3PAR needed a bit of help to get its fat-to-thin process working properly.

The latest T-class InServ storage array has clever hardware that turns an incoming fat volume into a thin one. This means that if you migrate a storage volume from some other array that does not have thin provisioning - a fat volume - then it automatically becomes a thin volume on the T-class because its contents pass through the hardware and repeated zeroes are stripped out, leaving just the actual written data in the volume.

That's lovely, only it isn't totally and ecstatically lovely because some of that written data could be deleted files. In fact quite a lot of it could be deleted files. Slow operating systems like Windows take shortcuts to keep the speed up. When they delete a file they sprint off to the disk, set a delete flag in the file header, sprint back again and say: "What's next?" without actually deleting the file at all. So it's full of data bytes instead of zeroes.

Cue migration to the T-class Inserv, and this Windows laziness completely defeats the fancy new 3PAR hardware which doesn't know a deleted file from a pain in the rear, which it is.

So 3PAR has got together with Symantec and its latest Veritas Storage Foundation volume manager product. What you do is use Storage Foundation's SmartMove to migrate the storage volume to the T-class. It detects the delete flag in files in the volume and doesn't send them to the T-class. What a smart move.

Symantec has also announced a Thin Reclamation API which can be used to trawl thinly-provisioned volumes and remove all the space taken up by deleted files. It returns this space to the array's central pool, thus ensuring your thin volume remains at its anorexic thinnest. You just run the thing every so often, much like defragging a PC's hard drive. Neat.

Symantec's SmartMove and Thin Reclamation API work with any thinly-provisioned storage array in principle. 3PAR is Symantec's first storage array partner to use it with HDS and HP issuing approving quotes in the Symantec release. They'll have it available as soon as they can get their array software working with the Symantec software.

Both SmartMove and the Thin Reclamation API are included in the latest version of Storage Foundation. It's available now and costs $695 per server. Um. So if you have 1,000 servers that's $695,000. Better not thinly provision your wallet. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.