Feeds
75%

Navman S30

3D satnav, anyone?

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Navman has stuck with the popular SiRFstar III GPS receiver, but the S30 3D also benefits from SiRF’s InstantFixII technology, which promises to determine where you are more quickly than ever before.

Sure enough, we found that although cold starts suffer from the usual 30 second or more delay, our location was pinpointed almost instantaneously after subsequent power-ons, which will come in very handy when emerging from tunnels or taking breaks on long journeys.

Navman S30 3D satnav

During navigation, the 3.5in screen feels a little claustrophobic

When on the road, the already cramped map is left jostling for space with no less than nine other buttons and indicators, not to mention the various road names and points of interest (POIs). A button at the bottom left of the screen provides access to volume, battery and satellite information, while tapping an area on the map brings up by a pop-up menu that, among other things, allows you to navigate to that particular location.

With this updated version of the S30, you also get 3D landmarks which, according to Navman, make it easier to ‘read your journey’. However, unless you’re driving around the centre of London or other major European cities, you’re unlikely to see many of these on-screen graphics. Even when you do come across one, they feel more like a gimmick than an actual navigation aide, and some look nothing like their real-life counterparts.

Navman S30 3D satnav

The S30 3D can just about be heard over the roar of motorway driving

The S30 3D is also not particularly smooth at updating your position, making it particularly hard to work out the correct exit at roundabouts, for example. The display is reasonably bright, but should the sun catch it straight-on you’ll be left squinting to see what’s going on. Day and Night modes are available - you can either let the S30 3D decide when to alternate between the two, or adjust it manually - along with a variety of colour schemes.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Boffins attempt to prove the UNIVERSE IS JUST A HOLOGRAM
Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy?
Our LOHAN spaceplane ballocket Kickstarter climbs through £8000
Through 25 per cent but more is needed: Get your UNIQUE rewards!
China building SUPERSONIC SUBMARINE that travels in a BUBBLE
Shanghai to San Fran in two hours would be a trick, though
LOHAN tunes into ultra long range radio
And verily, Vultures shall speak status unto distant receivers
SpaceX prototype rocket EXPLODES over Texas. 'Tricky' biz, says Elon Musk
No injuries or near injuries. Flight stayed in designated area
Galileo, Galileo! Galileo, Galileo! Galileo fit to go. Magnifico
I'm just a poor boy, nobody loves me. But at least I can find my way with ESA GPS by 2017
Astronomers scramble for obs on new comet
Amateur gets fifth confirmed discovery
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.