Feeds

Daily Mirror trapped in Wikicirclejerk

Journo seduced by cult of nonsense

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Yes, Virginia, Wikipedia is a trusted source for journalists the world over. Just ask David Anderson of The Daily Mirror.

In late August, after the draw for this season's UEFA Cup, someone calling themselves godpants decided he would add a few words to the Wikipedia page detailing a Cypriot football club known as AC Omonia. "A small but loyal group of fans are lovingly called 'The Zany Ones,'" he typed. "They like to wear hats made from discarded shoes and have a song about a little potato."

This was complete nonsense. But three weeks later, when Manchester City traveled to Omonia for a first round UEFA Cup tie, David Anderson added the nonsense in his match preview, which ran in the printed Daily Mirror and on its website.

"Despite City's raised profile, they must make do with the UEFA Cup this season and [manager Mark] Hughes will not tolerate any slip-ups against the Cypriot side, whose fans are known as the 'Zany Ones' and wear hats made from shoes," Anderson burbled.

His byline says he'd already made the trip to Cyrus. But apparently, firsthand research was still less convenient than a peek at the free online encyclopedia anyone can edit.

Then, a day later, in his match report, Anderson repeated the nonsense. "Omonia made City pay for their wastefulness," he wrote, "when they opened the scoring four minutes after the break to send their fans - nicknamed the Zany Ones - completely wild."

After godpants admitted his little prank and his story turned up in Private Eye, the Zany Ones bit was removed from Wikipedia's article. But in a shining example of the twisted logic that governs this free encyclopedia/worldwide cult, the nonsense was reinstated - with David Anderson's UEFA Cup preview cited as a source.

It has now been re-removed. For the moment. ®

Bootnote

A tip of the hat to Ian.

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.