Feeds

Firefox 3.1 beta arrives with JavaScript booster turned off

Rocket charger nowhere near launchpad

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Mozilla pushed out the first beta of Firefox 3.1 on Tuesday night but the release omits some much anticipated improved JavaScript functionality.

The preview edition of the open source web browser is intended to allow developers to run a slide rule over the software as well as giving the public at large a chance to take the software for a spin.

Major enhancements over version 3.0.x of the browser include a revamp of the Gecko layout engine, improved support for the latest developments in style sheet standards (ie CSS 2.1 and CSS 3 properties), a tab-switching shortcut and support for a range of new web technologies.

And, as previously reported, the next version of the browser includes a privacy (AKA prOn) surfing mode.

The "Web 3.1" features supported include Geolocation API, <video> and <audio> elements, and offline applications. The Geolocation API offers similar functionality to the recently release Geode add-on for Firefox 3.0.

One promised feature missing from the release is the TraceMonkey JavaScript engine, which promised to improve JavaScript speed by a factor of 40. Mozilla developers have been working on the "rocket-charger" since summer but it's been turned off in the first beta of Firefox 3.1.

Mozilla recently decided to release further preview editions of the browser so the technology might yet get the green light. A second beta is expected in late November ahead of the delayed release of the browser, expected sometime around the turn of the year. The appearance or not of the TraceMonkey JavaScript has become much more important since the release of Google Chrome, whose nippy handling of JavaScript apps has impressed.

Firefox 3.1 beta 1 is available for Linux, Mac and Windows machines and in 36 different languages. As with the beta release of any major browser software package the preview edition of Firefox 3.1 gives webmasters a chance to see how their site is rendered using the software and a chance to provide feedback or tweak their site.

More information on the release from Mozilla, including links to downloads, can be found here. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?