Feeds

MS roll out exploit prediction with Patch Tuesday

Here is the attack forecast

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Microsoft plans to debut impact predictions related to vulnerabilities with the next edition of its Patch Tuesday update cycle.

The 11 bulletins due to arrive later on Tuesday (14 October) will contain "weather predictions" detailing factors such as whether exploit code is likely to appear, alongside the established rating system on the severity of vulnerabilities. Microsoft hopes its Exploitability Index will help organisations to prioritise patching.

Microsoft, unlike Cisco and organisations like US Cert, won't be rating vulnerabilities under Common Vulnerability Scoring System. This is because it reckons (with some justification) that descriptions such as 'critical' or 'moderate' are more meaningful to the majority of people than ratings of between one and ten covered by CVSS.

Information on whether or not an exploit is available and assessments on the severity of threats are already available through the SANS Institute's well regarded monthly summary of Microsoft's bulletin. The Exploitability Index, announced two months ago, adds a predictive (crystal ball gazing) element to the mix.

Microsoft is also due to begin rolling out a program to give security vendors advance details on upcoming patches. The Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP), also announced at the Black Hat conference back in August, will operate under non-disclosure agreements to give anti-virus suppliers and the like the chance to prepare for patches and the attacks against unpatched Windows PCs that sometimes follow. Previously, the likes of Symantec and Sophos had no more idea what was due to arrive on Patch Tuesday than the great unwashed.

Tuesday's updates are due to cover flaws involving various components of Windows and Office, as well as an update from Microsoft Host Integration Server software. Four of these updates earn the dreaded rating of critical. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.