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Taser rival offers cops 'Trade in your Taser' zapgun deal

Also punts remote-control electroshock handcuffs

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An aggressive newcomer is muscling in on everyone's favourite cattleprod-enforcement firm, Taser International. Stinger Systems says its "advanced electro sparc-pulsed" zap weaponry is much safer for the victim miscreant, and is offering American police forces a cheap "trade in your Taser" deal.

According to Stinger:

Rather than have a large dump of initial current and energy into the body (current is what is dangerous to humans) the Stinger S-200's microcomputers allow for LESS current in the initial blast and smartly regulates the output energy thereafter. The results are less pain and great immobilization.

For a limited time, Stinger Systems will negotiate buy backs of Tasers from agencies, depending upon their quantity, model types, and age of the Tasers. The buy back price will be credited towards purchases of Stinger S-200’s, the most advanced stun technology available.

It seems that the City Of Fife in Washington state has just swapped their old school jitter-jolt-justice guns for Stingers.

"We liked the fact that the Stinger puts less electrical current into the body than the Taser," said Assistant Chief Mark Mears.

Like its better-established rival, Stinger Systems offers alternative electro-stun weaponry and accessories, as well as a basic flying-cattleprod pistol. For instance, Stinger has its "Ice" electrified riot shield, featuring "nine sparking display points on the front to provide a visible deterrent" - in direct competition to Taser's "peel and stick" zappercoat-on-a-roll conversion kit for existing shields.

Stinger also offers the "Band-It™", which it describes as an "electronic stun restraint". This is a cuff which can be fixed onto a prisoner, allowing the hapless suspect to be electrified into submission on demand - either "automatically on movement, or manually with a wireless remote up to 175 feet away". The battery pack is "good for two years," it says here.

It surely can't be long now until Strontium Dog-style "Electro-nux" knuckledusters come on the market. ®

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