Feeds

Sanyo beams as next-gen laser cuts it for 100GB Blu-ray Disc

Princess layer

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Sanyo has developed a blue laser that could enable 100GB capacity Blu-ray Discs and 166.67MB/s write speeds, 12 times the standard speed.

The new GaN laser diode operates at 450mW in pulsed mode - current diodes run at 250mW - and has enough power to write to four layers in a BD. Current disks top out at two 25GB layers and 6x writing speeds. Four layers means 100GB, said to be enough to store eight hours of HD video.

Sanyo's 450mW blue laser diode

The 12x writing speed effectively means 10GB/min or 166.66MB/sec

Sanyo has achieved the power in part by using higher-quality optical technology to to reduce light loss. It also added an edge coating to enhance what it called long-term reliability.

The Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) would need to approve the four-layer disc the new laser makes possible before any such product could carry the Blu-ray logo.

Sanyo reckons 100GB, 12x Blu-ray drives could arrive in 2010. It's possible that Blu-ray jukeboxes, used for storing archival data, could then increase in capacity. However, BDs no longer come in cartridges, and this has been cited as a weakness by enterprise-oriented optical disc suppliers such as Plasmon and InPhase.

Plasmon is currently in administration and negotiating with a buyer for its archive software/hardware business which has been plagued by the high cost of its drives. InPhase has been troubled by prolonged development delays, and its 300GB holographic drive has been said to be priced at $12,000.

Enterprise optical disc storage is stuck in a niche and unlikely to emerge from it unless it can get drive prices down. A 100GB would help do just that.

Were the BDA to formalise and promote a standard for a Blu-ray Disc in a cartridge then it would be game-over for competing optical disk technologies in the face of Blu-ray's overwhelming market credibility.

There are reports that Microsoft is considering adding an external Blu-ray drive option to its Xbox 360 games console, which used to support the now defunct HD DVD format. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
The cloud that goes puff: Seagate Central home NAS woes
4TB of home storage is great, until you wake up to a dead device
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
Intel offers ingenious piece of 10TB 3D NAND chippery
The race for next generation flash capacity now on
Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY
Pony up or push off, Zuck tells social marketeers
Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals
By writing a really angry letter about how it's harming our cloud business, ta
SAVE ME, NASA system builder, from my DEAD WORKSTATION
Anal-retentive hardware nerd in paws-on workstation crisis
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence
Download Choosing a Cloud Hosting Provider with Confidence to learn more about cloud computing - the new opportunities and new security challenges.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.