Feeds

Cisco ships Mexican drug runner music on VPN CD

Bootleg bootup CD features Narco Corridos tune

Top three mobile application threats

A sysadmin looking to set up a VPN network was surprised to discover that a Cisco installation CD contained Mexican music instead of security software. Cisco has acknowledged the issue and said that affected customers will be offered replacement CDs.

Instead of the intended software, some CDs shipped to Cisco customers featured 12 tracks of Mexican music, including Narco Corridos tunes from Diego 'El Compa' Rivas. Narco Corridos songs often celebrate drug running, and are popular in northern Mexico but derided by some as a "cancer that is killing Mexican music".

The tracks seem to be poor-quality bootleg remixes of the sort typically created by wannabe DJs, and how these MP3s got onto software installation CDs is unclear. Perhaps somebody in a factory making the CDs pressed the wrong button on a production line computer that had also been used for illegal downloads.

Blogger Dave Fumberger, who experienced the issue at work, writes about the incident in a posting here.

Cisco responded with a post saying that affected customers will receive replacement software. The networking giant's reply confirms that counterfeit networking kit or CDs were not involved in the issue without really explaining what happened in the first place.

Cisco is aware that some customers have received defective VPN Client CDs as part of recent orders.

Manufacturing is aware of this problem and is actively reshipping new media to impacted customers.

Defective VPN Client CDs can be identified by the following marking on the back of the media which ends in "MX21511/4"

The incident follows another strange occurrence involving Cisco two weeks ago, when lower case ts temporarily disappeared from the networking giant's homepage. ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Canadian taxman says hundreds pierced by Heartbleed SSL skewer
900 social insurance numbers nicked, says revenue watchman
German space centre endures cyber attack
Chinese code retrieved but NSA hack not ruled out
Burnt out on patches this month? Oracle's got 104 MORE fixes for you
Mass patch for issues across its software catalog
Reddit users discover iOS malware threat
'Unflod Baby Panda' looks to snatch Apple IDs
Oracle working on at least 13 Heartbleed fixes
Big Red's cloud is safe and Oracle Linux 6 has been patched, but Java has some issues
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.