Feeds

Cisco ships Mexican drug runner music on VPN CD

Bootleg bootup CD features Narco Corridos tune

Reducing security risks from open source software

A sysadmin looking to set up a VPN network was surprised to discover that a Cisco installation CD contained Mexican music instead of security software. Cisco has acknowledged the issue and said that affected customers will be offered replacement CDs.

Instead of the intended software, some CDs shipped to Cisco customers featured 12 tracks of Mexican music, including Narco Corridos tunes from Diego 'El Compa' Rivas. Narco Corridos songs often celebrate drug running, and are popular in northern Mexico but derided by some as a "cancer that is killing Mexican music".

The tracks seem to be poor-quality bootleg remixes of the sort typically created by wannabe DJs, and how these MP3s got onto software installation CDs is unclear. Perhaps somebody in a factory making the CDs pressed the wrong button on a production line computer that had also been used for illegal downloads.

Blogger Dave Fumberger, who experienced the issue at work, writes about the incident in a posting here.

Cisco responded with a post saying that affected customers will receive replacement software. The networking giant's reply confirms that counterfeit networking kit or CDs were not involved in the issue without really explaining what happened in the first place.

Cisco is aware that some customers have received defective VPN Client CDs as part of recent orders.

Manufacturing is aware of this problem and is actively reshipping new media to impacted customers.

Defective VPN Client CDs can be identified by the following marking on the back of the media which ends in "MX21511/4"

The incident follows another strange occurrence involving Cisco two weeks ago, when lower case ts temporarily disappeared from the networking giant's homepage. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Microsoft: You NEED bad passwords and should re-use them a lot
Dirty QWERTY a perfect P@ssword1 for garbage websites
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
NUDE SNAPS AGENCY: NSA bods love 'showing off your saucy selfies'
Swapping other people's sexts is a fringe benefit, says Snowden
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
British data cops: We need greater powers and more money
You want data butt kicking, we need bigger boots - ICO
Crooks fling banking Trojan at Japanese smut site fans
Wait - they're doing online banking with an unpatched Windows PC?
NIST told to grow a pair and kick NSA to the curb
Lrn2crypto, oversight panel tells US govt's algorithm bods
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.