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Ambulance Service not patient enough for Vista

No plans to migrate to unloved OS, despite Camwood claims

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Londoners can sleep safe in their beds tonight after the London Ambulance Service confirmed that it has no plans whatsoever to migrate to Windows Vista anytime soon.

A spokeswoman at the LAS was forced to rebuff claims this morning that the 999 service had in fact already adopted the unloved OS, after an app migration and change outfit wrongly suggested the LAS had rolled out Vista.

“We explored the possibility of running Vista, but have no plans to go ahead and migrate… We looked at what’s in place and decided other things had a much higher priority,” she told The Register.

Camwood made the screaming howler in a press release it spun out earlier this week.

It claimed the LAS, which received over 1.2m emergency calls last year, had already (some might say, worryingly) taken a lengthy stroll down the Vista path.

“Having made the decision to migrate to Microsoft Windows Vista, the London Ambulance Service needed to understand what compatibility issues it may face during the migration process,” said the company.

“Camwood was able to deliver a workshop back to the London Ambulance Service project team within a week, detailing all of the application compatibility issues they may face.”

Apparently, the firm uncovered that 39 per cent of apps used by the LAS wouldn’t be happy in Vista.

“However, adopting the recommended remediation actions, Camwood was able to increase the compatible applications to 82 per cent,” the company cheerily noted. “This left the London Ambulance Service with 11 per cent of their applications that required upgrades from the vendor and a further seven per cent that needed further testing.”

We contacted the LAS this morning to find out more about the project, as up to now the emergency service has remained very quiet about such a huge and significant IT rollout.

The baffled LAS spokeswoman told El Reg that such an assertion was completely inaccurate, before adding that desktops at the ambulance service currently run Windows XP.

We asked Camwood to comment on its misleading press release, but at time of writing the company hadn’t returned our call. Presumably it’s dealing with its own version of an emergency right about now. ®

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