Feeds

Intel shakes AMD's chip-fabbing baby

Cross-licensing custody battle

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

AMD's plans to spin its debt-dependent chip manufacturing biz into a separate entity may free the chipmaker from a considerable financial burden, but old rivalries with Intel will assure things don't go down without a hitch.

AMD intends to own 44.4 per cent of a new chip fabbing company, tentatively called The Foundry Company, while Abu Dhabi's Advance Technology Investment Company (ATIC) will own the rest. Both AMD and ATIC will have equal voting rights.

Shortly after AMD announced the deal, Intel shot back voicing "serious questions" about how it will affect an existing cross-licensing agreement between the two companies.

Penned in 2001, the agreement lets AMD use various Intel licenses and patents. (Only a heavily redacted copy of the agreement is available to the public so its exact nature is unknown). The pact also restricts AMD from transferring any of Intel's technologies to a third-party.

Intel believes AMD's joint-venture may violate the agreement.

"Intel has serious questions about this transaction as it relates to the license and will vigorously protect Intel's intellectual property rights," Intel spokesman Chuck Mulloy told Reuters.

AMD meanwhile claims its lawyers have already pored over the transaction and say it won't violate any agreements with Intel.

What the two companies' latest sparring match could mean for AMD's big plans won't be clear until Intel moves past the "questions" phase.

Proof again that old grudges die hard. But old cross-licensing agreements are nearly indestructible. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Musicians sue UK.gov over 'zero pay' copyright fix
Everyone else in Europe compensates us - why can't you?
Megaupload overlord Kim Dotcom: The US HAS RADICALISED ME!
Now my lawyers have bailed 'cos I'm 'OFFICIALLY' BROKE
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
BT said to have pulled patent-infringing boxes from DSL network
Take your license demand and stick it in your ASSIA
Right to be forgotten should apply to Google.com too: EU
And hey - no need to tell the website you've de-listed. That'll make it easier ...
prev story

Whitepapers

Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.