Feeds

HP jilts Intel SSDs

Smooches with Samsung

High performance access to file storage

After enthusiastically supporting Intel's solid state drive (SSD) launch in August, HP has gone and selected Samsung SSDs for its virtualisation blade server system.

The HP ProLiant BL495c is a blade server designed to run virtual machines, and wanting it to be a performance screamer, HP has given it two quad core Opteron processors and up to two 32GB or 64GB single level cell (SLC) Samsung SSDs.

The SSD dimensions are 7mm high by 100mm long by 70mm wide, and the maximum transfer rate is 1.5Gb/sec. HP stresses that these drives have no spin-up time and effectively zero latency compared to hard drives because there is no seek time involved in data access.

Samsung says that by using these instead of two 2.5-inch hard drives, HP has not only gained speed but also freed up space on the blade for more DRAM. The blade has 16 memory sockets for a total of 128GB of ECC 667MHz DDR2 memory.

HP Samsung SSD

HP's non-Intel SSD

Samsung says its SSDs read data at 100MB/sec and write it at 80MB/sec although HP specs mention 100MB/sec sequential reads and 50MB/sec sequential writes.

They use 0.5 watts when active, Samsung says, in comparison to a 15K rpm hard drive's 10 watts and 0.1 watt when in sleep mode.

The SSDs are used for local booting devices and for what is termed "general configuration storage."

The server has an integrated dual-channel 10 GbE server adapter with I/O expansion via a pair of mezzanine slots for optional Fibre Channel, Ethernet, and InfiniBand cards.

It is a terrific win for Samsung and a blow for Intel. It will be hoping that other server OEMs don't follow in HP's footsteps.

Update

The HP BL685c G5 Server Blade also has 128GB of memory while using two 2.5-inch hard drives. But this is because it is a double-height blade. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Seagate brings out 6TB HDD, did not need NO STEENKIN' SHINGLES
Or helium filling either, according to reports
European Court of Justice rips up Data Retention Directive
Rules 'interfering' measure to be 'invalid'
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.