Feeds

HP jilts Intel SSDs

Smooches with Samsung

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

After enthusiastically supporting Intel's solid state drive (SSD) launch in August, HP has gone and selected Samsung SSDs for its virtualisation blade server system.

The HP ProLiant BL495c is a blade server designed to run virtual machines, and wanting it to be a performance screamer, HP has given it two quad core Opteron processors and up to two 32GB or 64GB single level cell (SLC) Samsung SSDs.

The SSD dimensions are 7mm high by 100mm long by 70mm wide, and the maximum transfer rate is 1.5Gb/sec. HP stresses that these drives have no spin-up time and effectively zero latency compared to hard drives because there is no seek time involved in data access.

Samsung says that by using these instead of two 2.5-inch hard drives, HP has not only gained speed but also freed up space on the blade for more DRAM. The blade has 16 memory sockets for a total of 128GB of ECC 667MHz DDR2 memory.

HP Samsung SSD

HP's non-Intel SSD

Samsung says its SSDs read data at 100MB/sec and write it at 80MB/sec although HP specs mention 100MB/sec sequential reads and 50MB/sec sequential writes.

They use 0.5 watts when active, Samsung says, in comparison to a 15K rpm hard drive's 10 watts and 0.1 watt when in sleep mode.

The SSDs are used for local booting devices and for what is termed "general configuration storage."

The server has an integrated dual-channel 10 GbE server adapter with I/O expansion via a pair of mezzanine slots for optional Fibre Channel, Ethernet, and InfiniBand cards.

It is a terrific win for Samsung and a blow for Intel. It will be hoping that other server OEMs don't follow in HP's footsteps.

Update

The HP BL685c G5 Server Blade also has 128GB of memory while using two 2.5-inch hard drives. But this is because it is a double-height blade. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Bitcasa bins $10-a-month Infinite storage offer
Firm cites 'low demand' plus 'abusers'
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.