Feeds

Ford cars to gain prang-preventing radar rigs

A hit. A very palpable hit.

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

Ford is to build radar into some of next year's cars in order to prevent (hopefully) drivers bumping into things.

Dubbed "Collision Warning with Brake Support", the system sends out radio waves. If a rebounding signal reveals that the relative speeds of the car and the object in front indicate an impact, a buzzer sounds in the cabin to alert the driver.

It also shines a red light on the windscreen.

And if Joe Sixpack ignores these warnings? Ford's mechanism initiates "brake support", which readies the brakes so that the impact of the driver slamming the pedal doesn't end in a screeching skid, the thud of a bumper thump and the tinkle of shattered indicator-light housing.

Ford Collision Warning

So says Ford, which is keeping quiet about precisely how the brake support system works.

The notion behind Ford's system, which will debut in the US, isn't new, but the motor manufacturer claimed it was the first of its kind to be installed in mass-market autos.

The radar will also be used to adjust the speed of vehicles set to cruise control, to ensure they slow to stay a safe distance behind the car in front, Ford said. The system doesn't just look ahead - it also watches out for vehicles entering the driver's blind spot. That's handy, we'd say, given our experience of US drivers' attitude to lane discipline.

More likely, though, it'll be used to allow motorists to reverse out of parking bays more safely.

Earlier this week, Ford also said it was introducing 'smart keys' which can be programmed by parents to prevent the car from allowing their teenage offspring to drive too fast, not wear seatbelts and jack up the volume of the hi-fi.

It's not yet clear if it also prevents them from making out in the back.

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 claimed lives of HIV/AIDS cure scientists
Researchers, advocates, health workers among those on shot-down plane
Forty-five years ago: FOOTPRINTS FOUND ON MOON
NASA won't be back any time soon, sadly
Mwa-ha-ha-ha! Eccentric billionaire Musk gets his PRIVATE SPACEPORT
In the Lone Star State, perhaps appropriately enough
MARS NEEDS OCEANS to support life - and so do exoplanets
Just being in the Goldilocks zone doesn't mean there'll be anyone to eat the porridge
The Sun took a day off last week and made NO sunspots
Someone needs to get that lazy star cooking again before things get cold around here
Diary note: Pluto's close-up is a year from … now!
New Horizons is less than a year from the dwarf planet
Boffins discuss AI space program at hush-hush IARPA confab
IBM, MIT, plenty of others invited to fill Uncle Sam's spy toolchest, but where's Google?
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.