Feeds

Nexsan breaks up archive for faster search

Waves AaaS, but will customers bite?

Boost IT visibility and business value

Nexsan is splitting its content archive into pieces for faster search and archive service delivery to individual users.

A content-addressable store (CAS) is a disk-based storage array with software that stores files as objects with addresses based on their content. This storage product category was established by EMC's Centera product.

Nexsan's Assureon CAS product was introduced in 2005 and used serial ATA (SATA) drives. Its content can be encrypted and is single-instanced at the object level, but not within objects. Nexsan positions it partly as a greener and much less expensive alternative to EMC's Centera. In March last year Nexsan added a search capability and RAID 6 protection against double drive failures plus write-once-read-many (WORM) object storage to guarantee object storage integrity for compliance purposes.

The Assureon product uses Nexsan drive arrays with graduated spin-down to reduce the overall power consumption - Nexsan's AutoMAID technology. The main idea is to move fixed or reference, even persistent (competitor Copan's term) data off the fast arrays used to hold transactional data and put it on cheaper arrays. It can be stored more efficiently there, albeit with slower access, and safeguarded for future use.

The new Assureon 6.0 product splits the archive up into separate pieces that can be provided as individual archives for users, departments or other organisational units. Nexsan calls this archiving as a service (AaaS). The sub-archives are stored on separate drives or groups of drives so that each user or customer's data is physically removed from others'. The whole archive, a federation of the individual parts, can store 32 billion objects and scale to 5PB, Nexsan says. Search at the individual component level is much faster than searching the entire archive.

Nexsan, with a history of losses, filed for an $80.5m IPO in April this year, several months before the credit crunch-driven financial institution implosions led by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. It is hoping that its green appeal, feature set and product pricing below the tier one storage vendors - EMC, HP, IBM, NetApp, etc - will assure its success. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Pay to play: The hidden cost of software defined everything
Enter credit card details if you want that system you bought to actually be useful
HP busts out new ProLiant Gen9 servers
Think those are cool? Wait till you get a load of our racks
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
Community chest: Storage firms need to pay open-source debts
Samba implementation? Time to get some devs on the job
Like condoms, data now comes in big and HUGE sizes
Linux Foundation lights a fire under storage devs with new conference
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.