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Anonymous plans zombie Scientology protest

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Anonymous is planning a zombie-themed protest in the latest phase of its long-running campaign against the Church of Scientology.

The group, much in the news of late after a member reportedly hacked into the webmail account of Republican VP candidate Sarah Palin, is back on familiar ground with its ninth monthly protest against the religious organisation founded by L Ron Hubbard. Anonymous wants to dismantle the Church of Scientology by exposing its "illegal and immoral behavior".

The latest protests - due to take place on 18 October - will take place across the world, and feature shuffling members of the undead mingling with the more traditional Anonymous figures in Guy Fawkes masks.

The London-based demo will take its cue from the canon of George A Romero or maybe, since humour is said to be on the agenda, Shaun of the Dead, Anonymous explains.

Nightmare on LRH Way, the theme embraced by Los Angeles Anonymous, will showcase the group's interpretation of Scientology founder L Ron Hubbard's life; the macabre theme will show the stark contrast between reality and the fiction sold to his followers.

Last month Anonymous protested against the use of Scientology-based study techniques in schools. It had a sit-down meeting with actor Will Smith, who has founded a private school that plans to incorporate "Study Tech" (a Scientology method of learning) in the curriculum.

Smith told members of Anonymous that the New Village Leadership Academy won't be either paying licensing fees to the church nor acting as a recruit centre for Scientology.

More information about the latest phase of Project Chanology (including local listings) can be found at forums.whyweprotest.net, a new website for the group.

"Recent problems led to the loss of Anonymous' previous home, leaving many without a place to gather," a group statement explains. "In the downtime, WhyWeProtest.net's sister site, Scientology-Exposed.com, has done a wonderful job of bringing the global members of Anonymous together, and will continue to serve as both an ongoing meeting place and a backup when needed." ®

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