Feeds

Sprint threatens P2P throttling on WiMAX

Like Comcast (without the lies)

Boost IT visibility and business value

Sprint has reserved the right to limit the bandwidth of P2P file sharers on its brand new broadband wireless network..

According to the "acceptable use and network management policy" for the thing called Xohm, the company "may use various tools and techniques designed to limit the bandwidth available for certain bandwidth intensive applications or protocols, such as file sharing."

As you might expect, the Free Press - one of the watchdogs who sparked the FCC's investigation of Comcast's BitTorrent busting - isn't too happy about this. Sprint has touted Xohm as an open network, but Free Press says it's closed.

"We are very troubled by this development and the larger moves across the wireless industry to limit consumer access to the legal content and services of their choice," reads a statement from Free Press policy director Ben Scott. "We hope that Sprint will quickly disclose exactly what tools and techniques it plans to use, and demonstrate why it is necessary to maintain a closed network when consumers demand an open Internet."

Naturally, Sprint doesn't like this talk. "It is not our intent to police the internet or the content that our customers access," a company spokesman told us. "And we will not shape or modify the delivery of customer data. We are working to deliver a great customer experience for all of our customers. This is an open network... We are not targeting a specific application used on our WiMAX network."

Ah, but the network's terms and conditions also say this: "To protect our network, services, or for other reasons, we may place restrictions on accessing certain Data Content (such as certain websites, applications, etc.), limit throughput or the amount of data you can transfer, or otherwise limit or terminate services."

It's true: Sprint hasn't disclosed how it would throttle file sharing traffic. But it should at least be commended for admitting - upfront - that such throttling might happen. That was hardly the case with Comcast. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Scotland's BIG question: Will independence cost me my broadband?
They can take our lives, but they'll never take our SPECTRUM
Trying to sell your house? It'd better have KILLER mobile coverage
More NB than transport links to next-gen buyers - study
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
NBN Co adds apartments to FTTP rollout
Commercial trial locations to go live in September
Samsung Z Tizen OS mobe is post-phoned – this time for good?
Russian launch for Sammy's non-droid knocked back
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
Seeking LTE expert to insert small cells into BT customers' places
Is this the first step to a FON-a-like 4G network?
What FTC lawsuit? T-Mobile US touts 10GB, $100 family-of-4 plan
Folks 'could use that money for more important things' says CEO Legere
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.