Feeds

Servers buckle as Congress rejects $700bn Wall Street bailout

Microsoft assumes voice of reason

Security for virtualized datacentres

Following the US House of Representatives rejection of a $700bn the financial bailout bill and the ensuing stock market carnage, it's easy to overlook the unspoken victims of today's Wall Street meltdown.

We're referring, of course, to the machines running the House's official web site. Millions of individuals seeking information about the forsaken legislation have slowed its 10 servers to a crawl.

"We haven't had this much demand since the 9/11 commission report," a spokesman for the House sysadmin Jeff Ventura told the AP.

Site visitors eager for more information on the bill or wishing to email House members will endure fantastically reduced speeds while a tidal wave of packets jostle for attention.

Ventura said he expects the slowdown — which affects all House member websites — to last until Tuesday. He pledges technicians will be working through the night to help handle the massively increased traffic.

Other sites that eyeball US legislation have also taken a severe beating today. GovTrack.us was shut down late today, posting a message that read "so many people are searching for the economic relief bill that GovTrack can't handle it.

"Take a break and come back later when the world cools off!"

News sites such as The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal were also pummeled immediately following Congress' rejection of the bailout bill. ®

Microsoft calls bailout decision a critical error

In case you were wondering how Microsoft stands on the issue, it's not terribly pleased. Redmond said today the bill's failure to pass could result in a blue screen of death for the economy.

"Microsoft strongly urges members of the U.S. House of Representatives to reconsider and to support legislation that will re-instill confidence and stability in the financial markets," Microsoft general counsel Brad Smith said in a statement. "This legislation is vitally important to the health and preservation of jobs in all sectors of the economy of Washington State and the nation, and we urge Congress to act swiftly."

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Special pleading against mass surveillance won't help anyone
Protecting journalists alone won't protect their sources
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.