Feeds

Poptastic MySpace Music launches, without indies

Big splash for Big Music

New hybrid storage solutions

MySpace Music, the ambitious new joint venture between the major record labels and News Corporation, has finally gone live. Don't let the name mislead you - the only thing it has in common with the scrappy ethos of the original "MySpace" is the name.

Executives have said they want the service to be "the new MTV", and the launch offering certainly lives up to those low ambitions.

The major labels are equity owners in the joint venture - and are pumping in exclusive content. Meanwhile, no independent label has yet to strike a deal with MSM, either independently or through the indies' rights licensing body Merlin. Merlin chief Charles Caldas drew attention to the disparity between the reality and earlier comments by MySpace chief Chris DeWolfe that "indie bands are really the heart of MySpace".

Digital distributor Orchard has licensed some indie material to MSM, but it's a limited selection of repertory. Merlin's members can claim nine per cent of the US market - about on a par with EMI, the smallest of the Big Four.

But MySpace Music needs the indies far more than it thinks. As one music blog points out, it looks like a money laundering operation by the shareholders.

"The four major labels are part of huge companies that also own stake in movie production companies, clothing lines, airlines, car companies..." writes Tripwire editor Derek Evers. "So when they give you a song for free that is being paid for by advertisers, it will inevitably shrink the pool of what is made available, promoted and advertised."

"In essence, the major labels have found a way to pay themselves."

Evers concludes, sarcastically:

"If MySpace becomes the MTV of the internet, can someone show me where to find the MySpace of the internet?"

As we reported recently, the exclusion of independents from MySpace has already raised competition concerns. Digital distribution ventures don't need to have a dominant market share to draw the attention of regulators - merely the prospect that they might. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Quit drooling, fanbois - haven't you SEEN what the iPhone 6 costs?
How keen will buyers be when exposed to the real price?
Ex-Autonomy execs: HP's latest wad blows apart fraud allegations
Top bods claim IT titan's latest court filing is smoking gun of 'reckless aggression'
Forget silly privacy worries - help biometrics firms make MILLIONS
Beancounter reckons dabs-scanning tech is the next big moneypit
Elon Musk says Tesla's stock price is too high ... welp, NOT ANY MORE
As Nevada throws the SpaceX supremo a $1.25bn bone
Microsoft's Office Delve wants work to be more like being on Facebook
Office Graph, social features for Office 365 going public
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.