Feeds

AMD pooh-poohs 'Atom smasher' cancellation claim

Why drop 'Bobcat' long before it's needed?

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

So farewell then, Bobcat, AMD's answer to Intel's 'Silverthorne' Atom processor family? AMD's denying it, but at least one analyst is tolling the low-power chip's death knell.

Avi Cohen, managing partner at US investment house Avian Securities, this week told clients: "There are reports that AMD has decided to cancel its Bobcat project."

Cohen regards this as a good thing. Trying to compete with Atom would be very hard, he reckons, severely limiting what AMD will get out of its investment in development and production resources for the processor.

To be fair, Cohen admits that he doesn't know for sure that the Bobcat project is over - his analysis is clearly conducted on the assumption that the rumours are true, but he provides no evidence that they might be.

For its part, AMD roundly rejected the speculation. ''Bobcat remains under development as an important future core for AMD," a spokesman told EETimes.

Talk of Bobcat's demise may arise from AMD's limited discussion of the part. While Bobcat's been known to be in development for some time, AMD has said little about it. However, in July, CEO Dirk Meyer said that AMD's response to Atom would be detailed in Q4.

It was assumed - by us, as well as other observers - that he meant Bobcat. In fact, he appears to have been referring to AMD's Ultra-Value Client (UVC) platform, which is based on a couple of Athlon processors, one single-core the other a dualie. AMD roadmaps show UVC being launched right at the time Meyer mentioned.

That, in turn, may well have persuaded some folk that AMD's dropping Bobcat for Athlon. But it's worth remembering that Intel has two strands of Atom: 'Diamondville' for mini laptops and 'Silverthorne' for handheld mobile internet devices (MIDs). UVC will go up against Diamondville, while Bobcat will target Silverthorne.

Right now, UVC is more important to AMD than Bobcat - the market for MIDs is simply too small, hence Cohen's comments. But, as ABI Research this week forecast, MIDs could account for 36m mobile device shipments in 2013 - 136m out of 400m - and that includes not only netbooks but regular laptops too.

Now's not the time for Bobcat - AMD has a few more years to perfect the product then release it just before world+dog goes MID mad. If, of course, it does...

Low-power CPU reviews
Intel Atom 230
VIA Nano

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
Don't wait for that big iPad, order a NEXUS 9 instead, industry little bird says
Google said to debut next big slab, Android L ahead of Apple event
Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST
It's not just a thumb war, it's total digit war
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
A drone of one's own: Reg buyers' guide for UAV fanciers
Hardware: Check. Software: Huh? Licence: Licence...?
The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters
Fandroids, Windows Phone fringe-oids – you wouldn't understand
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.